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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 29 5 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 27 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 17, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 10, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for James R. Herbert or search for James R. Herbert in all documents.

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Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: Maryland's First patriotic movement in 1861. (search)
e marched with a semblance of order from Baltimore to the Point of Rocks. Some straggled in by twos and threes. Some came in squads on the railroad. But the State was aflame and a steady stream of gallant youth poured into the rendezvous at Point of Rocks and Harper's Ferry. By May 21st there were the skeletons of eight companies collected at Point of Rocks: Co. A. Capt. Bradley T. Johnson. Co. B. Capt. C. C. Edelin, at Harper's Ferry. Co. C. Capt. Frank S. Price. Co. D. Capt. James R. Herbert. Co. E. Capt. Harry McCoy. Co. F. Capt. Thomas G. Holbrook. Co. G. Capt. Wilson Carey Nicholas. Co. H. Capt. Harry Welmore. They were mustered into the service of the Confederate States on May 21st and 22d by Lieut.-Col. George Deas, inspector-general on the staff of Gen. Jos. E. Johnston, who in the meantime had superseded Colonel Jackson in command at Harper's Ferry. Captain Johnson, as senior captain, refused to recognize the Virginia authorities. Relying on the promise of M
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: Maryland's overthrow. (search)
solved—That the thanks of the Maryland Line be tendered to Mrs. Captain Bradley T. Johnson for her earnest, patriotic and successful efforts in arming and equipping the Maryland Line. Resolved—That we, the officers, pledge ourselves and for our men that the arms she has obtained shall at the close of the war be returned to the State of North Carolina, without stain or dishonor. Resolved—That these resolutions be signed by the officers of the meeting and presented to Mrs. Johnson. James R. Herbert, President. I. G. W. Harriott, Secretary. She forthwith returned to Richmond for clothes and the tents. She secured cloth for uniforms, by permission of Governor Letcher, by purchasing it from the mills where it was manufactured for the State of Virginia, and she paid for making it up into uniforms. Shoes, blankets and underclothes were supplied by Col. Larkin Smith, quartermaster-general; and the tents had been ordered on her way back from North Carolina. On June 29th she start<
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: Marylanders enlist, and organize to defend Virginia and the Confederacy. (search)
the First regiment was mustered out of service August 12, 1862, on account of its depleted ranks, which had been worn threadbare by Jackson's Valley campaign and the Seven Days battles, the men who were mustered out were largely collected by Captains Herbert, Murray and Goldsborough, who formed three new companies, which with others formed the Second Maryland infantry battalion, of which Herbert became lieutenant-colonel commanding, and Goldsborough major. The Second Maryland was officered by Herbert became lieutenant-colonel commanding, and Goldsborough major. The Second Maryland was officered by trained and experienced soldiers. Almost every one of its captains had seen more than one year's service in the army of northern Virginia, and its field officers had been among the brightest captains in the Old First, as the First regiment was always designated in the hearts and words of its old members. The Second Maryland infantry and the First Maryland cavalry were in the valley of Virginia about Harrisonburg in the winter of 1862 and 1863. Co. F of the cavalry was recruited by three rich
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: Marylanders in 1862 under Generals Joseph E. Johnston and Stonewall Jackson. (search)
as pointing out the positions and topography, swinging his arm right and left. Look at Ashby enjoying himself, said the Maryland colonel to Adjutant Ward riding by his side. They pushed across the open field and entered the wood. The evening sun was shooting its horizontal arrows through the June foliage. The wood was open, with little undergrowth and the timber well grown and large. Ewell sent over to the First Maryland for skirmishers. Company G, Captain Nicholas, and Company D, Captain Herbert, were sent to him. They were deployed in front of the two columns, Virginians on the right, Marylanders on the left, and the whole pressed on into the darkening wood. Soon the dropping fire of the skirmishers on the right showed that they had found the enemy, and Ashby moved the Virginians in line straight to the firing. Ewell remained with the Marylanders and threw them into line and marched them straight forward, Ewell and Johnson riding on the right. All at once the skirmish fire
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: Marylanders in 1862 under Gen. Robert E. Lee. (search)
n. His words as he fell were, Go on, boys, don't mind me, and he died at his next breath. Lieut. Nicholas Snowden, of Company D, who died at the same time, had been captain of a cavalry company in Prince George's in 1860-61, and had joined Captain Herbert, his cousin, at Harper's Ferry, early in May, 1861. He was as honest, gallant and high-minded a gentleman as ever lived. The blood that Maryland poured out on that evening of June 6th was as precious and as glorious as any she has ever givd to go to Richmond, or become an applicant for a place he had won by hard service, and Jackson assigned him to command the Second brigade, Jackson's division, Second corps—Jackson's own. A new regiment was soon brought together, of which James R. Herbert became lieutenant-colonel, and William W. Goldsborough, major. But the disbanding of the gallant First regiment, although another was so soon formed, was attended by some unfortunate results. It will be noted that when the army crossed t
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: Maryland artillery—Second Maryland regiment infantryFirst Maryland cavalry. (search)
e battle of Sharpsburg. Those most active and influential in recruiting new companies were Captains Herbert, Goldsborough, Lieutenant George Thomas, Corporal Clapham Murray, Private W. P. Zollinger, ginia regiment for the preceding year. The regiment was organized as follows: Lieutenant-Colonel, James R. Herbert. Major, William W. Goldsborough, Adjutant, J. Winder Laird. Acting Adjutant, Ltion of the new command. He declined the proffered commission on the ground that it was due to Herbert as the senior officer of those who had got together, armed, equipped, drilled and instructed the Second Maryland. They had done the work and should have the honors. So Captain Herbert was elected lieutenant-colonel and Captain Goldsborough major. The Second Maryland was employed during thed in Steuart's brigade, including one hundred in the Second Maryland. In this attack Lieutenant-Colonel Herbert was severely wounded by three balls, it was believed mortally. They held their place
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), chapter 11 (search)
SecondLieu-tenant, Wm. P. Thomas. First-Sergeant, Wm. Smyth. Sergeants, Sterling Murray, John B. Berryman, John H. Uhlhorn. Corporals, Chas. A. Arnold, John O'Loughlin, Frank S. Price, Henry C. Scott. Musician, Hosea Pitt. Company D—Captain, James R. Herbert. First-Lieutenant, Geo. W. Booth. Second-Lieutenant, Wm. Key Howard, Nicholas Snowden. First-Sergeant, Geo. F. Ruff. Sergeants, Chas. J. Wegner, Wm. H. Slingluff, Edward L. King, Mason E. McKnew. Corporals, Edward Selvage, Jos. Wranckson's Hill, Munson's Hill, Rappahannock River, Front Royal, Winchester, Harrisonburg, Cross Keys, Mechanicsville, Gaines' Mill, Dispatch Station, Malvern Hill, Harrison Landing. Second Maryland infantry. Field and staff. Lieutenant-Colonel, James R. Herbert; Major, Wm. W. Goldsborough; Surgeon, Richard P. Johnson; Assistant-Surgeon, DeWilton Snowden; A. Q. M., John E. Howard; Adjutant, J. Winder Laird; Sergeant-Major, Wm. R. McCullough; Q. M. Sergeant, Edwin James; Ordnance-Sergeant,
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Appendix A. (search)
ompany C, wounded—Capt. Ferdinand Duvall, severely. Company D, wounded—John Devres, mortally. Company E, wounded-Lieut. W. R. Byers; captured, Joseph P. Quinn. Total, 9 wounded and I captured. at Gettysburg, July 3, 1863. Wounded—Col. James R. Herbert, Maj. W. W. Goldsborough. Company A, killed—Capt. W. H. Murray; Privates Wm. Bruce, John W. Hardesty, James Iglehart, Jr., Arthur Kennedy, C. T; Lloyd, Geo. W. McIntire, Wilbur Morrison, McCormick, Herman Nicholai, George C. Starlings,H. Holliday, Henry C. Owens. Wounded— Thomas O'Brien, Alexander Fulton, mortally, Thomas D. Harrison, Frederick Heiston, Ivan C. Henry, Wm. Hoffman. Company B, First-Lieut. John H. Stone. Wounded-First Lieut. John H. Stone; privates, James R. Herbert, A. W. Neale, Rinaldo I. Moran. Company C, Capt. Ferdinand Duvall. Wounded—Second Lieut. Morris H. Tolson; Privates Wm. H. Claggett, C. S. Ford, Henry Loughran, R. B. Willis. Company D, First Lieut. James S. Franklin. Killed—Private Jam