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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 37 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 27 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 17 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Pea Ridge, Ark. (search)
rigade loss: k, 29; w, 195; in, 3 = 227. Cavalry: 1st Mo., Col. C. A. Ellis. Loss: k, 2; w, 2; m, 2 = 6. Fourth division, Col. Eugene A. Carr (w). Staff loss: w, 1. First Brigade, Col. Grenville M. Dodge: 35th Ill., Col. Gustavus A. Smith (w), Lieut.-Col. William P. Chandler (c); 4th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. John Galligan (w); 1st Iowa, Battery, Capt. Junius A. Jones (w), Lieut. V. J. David. Brigade loss: k, 35; w, 200; m, 55 = 290. Second Brigade, Col. William Vandever: 9th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. Francis J. Herron (w and c), Major William H. Coyl (w); Phelps's Mo., Col. John S. Phelps (w); 3d 111. Cavalry, Major John McConnell; 3d Iowa Battery, Captain Mortimer M. Hayden. Brigade loss: k, 61; w, 300; m, 30 = 391. Unattached; 3d Iowa Cavalry, Col. Cyrus Bussey (during a part of the battle Col. Bussey had command of other troops in addition to his own regiment), Lieut.-Col. Henry H. Trimble (w); Bowen's Battalion Mo. Cavalry, Major Wm. D. Bowen; 3d Mo. Infantry, Major Joseph Conrad; 24th M
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.63 (search)
00 men. At last Blunt attacked in force on the 28th of November, and drove Marmaduke back to the vicinity of Van Buren. Blunt then took position at Cane Hill. Hindman resolved to attack him there with his whole available force. Leaving Van Buren on the 3d of December with 9000 infantry, 2000 cavalry, and 22 pieces of artillery, about 11,500 men in all, he drove in Blunt's pickets on the evening of the 6th, and was getting ready to attack him the next evening, when he learned that General F. J. Herron was coming to reenforce Blunt with about 4000 infantry, 2000 cavalry, and 30 guns, and was already entering Fayetteville. Blunt had learned on the 24th of December that Hindman was moving his infantry from the south side of the Arkansas to the north side of that river. He immediately ordered Herron, who was encamped with two divisions of the Army of the Frontier near Springfield; to come instantly to Cane Hill. That excellent officer broke camp on the morning of the 3d, and, marc
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces in Arkansas, December 7th, 1862--September 14th, 1863. (search)
John G. Clark: 26th Ind., Col. John G. Clark; 7th Mo. Cav., Maj. Eliphalet Bredett (k), Capt. Wesley R. Love; A, 2d Ill. Art'y, Lieut. Herman Boris. Brigade loss: k, 30; w, 181; m, 132 =343. Second Brigade, Col. William McE. Dye: 37th Ill., Lieut.-Col. John C. Black (w), Maj. Henry M. Frisbie; 20th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. Joseph B. Leake; 2d Battalion, 6th Mo. Cav., Maj. Samuel Montgomery; F, 1st Mo. Art'y, Capt. David Murphy. Brigade loss: k, 17; w, 99; m, 38=154. Third division, Brig.-Gen. Francis J. Herron (in command of Second and Third Divisions combined). Escort, etc.: 1st Mo. Cav. (battalion), Maj. James M. Hubbard (c), Capt. Amos L. Burrows. Loss: w, 5; m, 13 = 18. First Brigade, Lieut.-Col. Henry Bertram: 10th Ill. Cav., Temporarily organized as a cavalry brigade under Col. Dudley Wickersham. Lieut.-Col. James Stuart; 1st Iowa Cav., Temporarily organized as a cavalry brigade under Col. Dudley Wickersham. Col. James O. Gower; 1st Battalion, 2d Wis. Cav., Temporari
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.69 (search)
the general command at that point. On the 11th a strong division arrived from the Department of the Missouri under General Herron, which was placed on our left. This cut off the last possible chance of communication between Pemberton and Johnston, as it enabled Lauman to close up on McClernand's left, while Herron intrenched from Lauman to the water's edge. At this point the water recedes a few hundred yards from the high land. Through this opening, no doubt, the Confederate commanders hadk part in the East Tennessee campaign.--editors. and was immediately dispatched to Haynes's Bluff. These latter troops — Herron's and Parke's — were the reenforcements already spoken of, sent by Halleck in anticipation of their being needed. They a from Haynes's Bluff to the Big Black River. This amounted now to quite half the troops about Vicksburg. Besides these, Herron's and A. J. Smith's divisions were ordered to hold themselves in readiness to reenforce Sherman. Haynes's Bluff had been
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces in the Vicksburg campaign: May 1st-July 4th, 1863. (search)
pt. Henry Dillon: M, 1st Mo., Lieut. Junius W. MacMurray; 11th Ohio, Lieut. Fletcher E. Armstrong; 6th Wis., Capt. Henry Dillon, Lieut. Samuel F. Clark; 12th Wis., Capt. William Zickerick. Artillery loss: Jackson, w, 2. Champion's Hill, w, 2. Herron's division (joined June 11), Maj.-Gen. Francis J. Herron. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Wm. Vandever: 37th Ill., Col. John C. Black; 26th Ind., Col. John G. Clark; 20th Iowa, Col. Wm. McE. Dye; 34th Iowa, Col. George W. Clark; 38th Iowa, Col. D. HMaj.-Gen. Francis J. Herron. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Wm. Vandever: 37th Ill., Col. John C. Black; 26th Ind., Col. John G. Clark; 20th Iowa, Col. Wm. McE. Dye; 34th Iowa, Col. George W. Clark; 38th Iowa, Col. D. Henry Hughes; E, 1st Mo. Art'y, Capt. Nelson Cole; F, 1st Mo. Art'y, Capt. Joseph Foust. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Wm. W. Orme: 94th Ill., Col. John McNulta; 19th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. Daniel Kent; 20th Wis., Col. Henry Bertraum; B, 1st Mo. Art'y, Capt. Martin Welfley. unattached cavalry, Col. Cyrus Bussey: 5th Ill., Maj. Thomas A. Apperson; 3d Iowa, Maj. Oliver H. P. Scott; 2d Wis., Col. Thomas Stephens. District North-east Louisiana.--Brig.-Gen. Elias S. Dennis. detached Brigade, Col. G
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Naval operations in the Vicksburg campaign. (search)
the batteries above and below, while her broadside enfiladed the ravines down which the enemy was pouring in masses. The gun-boat's rapid discharge of shrapnel and shell told heavily upon the Confederates, who, after sustaining it for a time, fled in disorder, Prentiss's men pursuing them with the bayonet. The destructive fire of the Tyler caused an unusually severe loss. The fall of Vicksburg was followed by successful gun-boat raids, one in July under Selfridge in the Red, Black, and Tensas rivers, the other in August under Bache in White River. General Herron and Lieutenant-Commander Walker also proceeded up the Yazoo and retook Yazoo City, but with the loss of the De Kalb, destroyed by torpedoes near Yazoo City. [See p. 580.] The vessel sank in fifteen minutes, but all hands were saved. Porter accepted the misfortune with that true understanding of the business of war which had been the secret of so much of his success — that without taking risks you cannot achieve results
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The capture of Port Hudson. (search)
-as well as 2 guns, while Green's loss was 3 killed and 30 wounded. As the gun-boats could not be got round to Berwick Bay in time to cut off Taylor, he crossed Berwick Bay on the 21st with all his spoils that he could carry away and took post on the lower Teche, until in September the Nineteenth Corps, reorganized and placed under the command of Franklin, once more advanced into the Teche country and drove him back toward Opelousas. After the fall of Vicksburg and Port Hudson, Grant sent Herron's division, and the Thirteenth Corps under Ord, to report to Banks. Banks went to Vicksburg to consult with Grant, and Grant came to New Orleans; together they agreed with Admiral Farragut in urging an immediate attack on Mobile. This was the only true policy; success would have been easy and must have influenced powerfully the later campaigns that centered about Chattanooga and Atlanta; but for reasons avowedly political rather than military, the Government ordered, instead, an attempt to
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 20: events West of the Mississippi and in Middle Tennessee. (search)
ce from Fayetteville and fall on their front. Herron first at the dawn of the 28th. Oct., 1862. Hitance of the services of Schofield was Francis J. Herron. gratefully acknowledged by the loyalises northward. Informed of this, Blunt sent to Herron, then in Missouri, for assistance. That excel at Elk Horn on the 5th, December, 1862. when Herron sent forward his cavalry, three thousand strona's Mill, and were interposing between him and Herron's infantry and artillery. This alarming fact teville the next morning. Blunt tried to warn Herron of his danger, but failed, because of the vigint on Illinois Creek, called Prairie Grove. Herron was divested of his cavalry, and had. only abothey too were compelled to fall back. While Herron was thus struggling, at half-past 2 o'clock inleft, where the troops had been massed to turn Herron's right. A severe battle ensued. Blunt brouge captured by Marmaduke when he first attacked Herron's cavalry. General Blunt estimated the Confed[6 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 23: siege and capture of Vicksburg and Port Hudson. (search)
ith the divisions of Generals A. J. Smith and Kimball, of the Sixteenth corps. These were assigned to the, command of General Washburne. On the llth of June General Herron arrived with his division from the Department of Missouri, and on the 14th two divisions of the Ninth corps came, under General Parke. N~Tow the investment ocPherson's next, and extending to the railway, and Ord's (late McClernand's) on the left, the investment in that direction being made complete by the divisions of Herron and Lauman, the latter lying across Stout's Bayou, and touching the bluffs on the river. Parke's corps, and the divisions of Smith and Kimball, were sent to Hainhis rear, and for that purpose he dispatched Sherman, with a large force. The result will be noticed hereafter. He also prepared to send an expedition under General Herron to assist Banks in the reduction of Port Hudson, when he received intelligence of events at that stronghold which made the expedition unnecessary. Let us obs
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Vicksburg, siege of (search)
orter had joined in the fray; but this second assault was unsuccessful. The Nationals had lost about 3,000 men. Then Grant determined on a regular siege. His effective force then did not exceed 20,000 men. The beleaguered garrison had only about 15,000 effective man out of 30,000 within the lines, with short rations for only a month. Grant was soon reinforced by troops of Generals Lanman, A. J. Smith, and Kimball, which were assigned to the command of General Washburne. Then came General Herron from Missouri (June 11) with his division, and then a part of the 9th Corps, under General Parke. With these troops, his force numbered nearly 70,000 men, and, with Porter's fleet, Vicksburg was completely enclosed. Porter kept up a continual bombardment and cannonade for forty days, during which time he fired 7,000 mortarshells, and the gunboats 4,500 shells. Grant drew his lines closer and closer. He kept up a bombardment day and night. The inhabitants had taken shelter in caves d
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