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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 103 5 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 98 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 89 13 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 81 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 43 9 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 43 1 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 42 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 9 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 37 3 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 36 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee. You can also browse the collection for Heth or search for Heth in all documents.

Your search returned 22 results in 6 document sections:

Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 11: Chancellorsville. (search)
r me. Jackson is dead, and Lee beats McClellan with his untruthful bulletins. It is not known whether Mr. Lincoln ever answered this question. The truth is, the Army of the Potomac was woefully mismanaged. Its commander guided it into the mazes of the Wilderness and got it so mixed and tangled that no chance was afforded for a display of its mettle. General Paxton was killed while leading his brigade with conspicuous courage in the assault of the 3d. Generals A. P. Hill, Nichols, McGowan, Heth, Hoke, and Pender were wounded. Chancellorsville is inseparably connected in its glory and gloom with Stonewall Jackson. General Lee officially writes: I do not propose to speak here of the character of this illustrious man, since removed from the scene of his eminent usefulness by the hand of an inscrutable but all-wise Providence. I nevertheless desire to pay the tribute of my admiration to the matchless energy and skill that marked this last act of his life, forming, as it did, a wor
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 12: Gettysburg. (search)
On the 30th Pettigrew, commanding a brigade of Heth's division, Hill's corps, was directed to marcheard beating on the other side of the town. So Heth told Hill if he had no objection, he would takeur miles from Gettysburg, and await orders. Heth, after his coveted shoes, reached McPherson's rth's division leading. Hill, who had followed Heth with Pender's division, sent it rapidly to his ading division (Rodes's), at 2.30 P. M. came to Heth's and Pender's support, while Early's division,d and Mc-Laws. He was therefore re-enforced by Heth's division and two brigades of Pender's (Hill'sn President), Brockenbrough's, and Archer's (of Heth's division, under that fine officer Pettigrew, Heth having been wounded the day before)-were placed on Pickett's left, and two, Lane's and Scales'sy, supported by artillery, appeared in front of Heth's division, which, acting as rear guard, was fia visit to the army-Mrs. Ewell, Mrs. Walker, Mrs. Heth, etc. General Meade's army is north of the R[4 more...]
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 13: campaign in Virginia.-Bristol Station.-mine Run.-Wilderness. (search)
feign attack on Grant's right and assail his left flank, Grant's to attack along his whole line. Sedgwick was attacked before his orders required him to attack; but Longstreet was not yet up, nor was Anderson's division of Hill's corps. So Lee had to wait on his right; but Hancock His own corps and Getty's division of the Sixth, and Wads-worth's of the Second Corps; afterward he was re-enforced by a divis-ion of the Ninth Corps. with nearly forty thousand men did not wait, but rushed on Heth and Wilcox's division of Hill's corps, and finally carried their whole front and drove their right back in some confusion. Lee's right wing was threatened with disaster; neither Longstreet's corps nor Anderson's division of Hill's had arrived. The former left his camp near Gordonsville at 4 P. M. on the 4th, and marched that afternoon sixteen miles. The next day, when Hill and Ewell were fighting, he resumed his march, lost his way, had to retrace his steps, and finally went into camp on th
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 14: siege of Petersburg. (search)
. Dearing's Confederate cavalry was there and reported to Beauregard the occupation of the railroad by infantry, who sent Heth with two brigades to attack him. A sharp encounter between Ayers's division and Heth followed, in which both sides lost heHeth followed, in which both sides lost heavily. On the 19th the fighting was renewed, both sides being re-enforced. Hill attacked with five brigades under Heth and Mahone, a division of cavalry, and Pegram's batteries, at the intersection of the Vaughn road with the railroad. Heth and MaHeth and Mahone, a division of cavalry, and Pegram's batteries, at the intersection of the Vaughn road with the railroad. Heth and Mahone made a fine effort, meeting with deserved success, but were later in turn repulsed. Warren lost three thousand men, and on the 20th fell back a mile and a half and intrenched. On the 21st Hill again attacked, but was unsuccessful. General SanHeth and Mahone made a fine effort, meeting with deserved success, but were later in turn repulsed. Warren lost three thousand men, and on the 20th fell back a mile and a half and intrenched. On the 21st Hill again attacked, but was unsuccessful. General Sanders, of Mahone's brigade, was killed. Hancock was now brought up with instructions to destroy the Weldon Railroad south of Ream's Station. He was attacked by Hill on the 25th at 5 P. M. with eight infantry brigades and two divisions of cavalry
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 15: evacuation of Richmond and the Petersburg lines.--retreat and surrender. (search)
ith his rear for some miles, capturing thirteen flags, four guns, and some seventeen hundred prisoners. Gordon reached High Bridge that night, but lost a large part of a wagon train which had given the Confederates much trouble on the whole march and greatly delayed their progress, because drawn by weak animals over roads soft and muddy from the recent rains. Longstreet, after waiting in vain for the other commands to join him at Rice Station, under instructions marched with the divisions of Heth, Wilcox, and Field for Farmville, and that night crossed to the north side of the Appomattox. He had crossed that river twice already-once at Petersburg and once at Goode's Bridge. Fitz Lee's cavalry corps followed him, crossing the river above Farmville by a deep ford, leaving a force to burn the bridge. Gordon, to whose command Bushrod Johnson's division had been assigned, crossed at High Bridge, below Farmville, and so did Mahone with his fine division. At Farmville the Confederates
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
, mentioned, 269. Hardee, General William J., 54, 58, 59, 369. Harold at Hastings, 278. Harper's Ferry, 74, 75, 76, 103, 202, 203, 220, 303. Harrison, Benjamin, the signer, 10. Harrison's Landing, Va., 170. Harvie's, Lewis, statement, 383. Haskell, Lieutenant-Colonel, John, 358. Hatcher's Run, Va., 376. Havelock, Sir, Henry, 422. Havens, Benny, of West Point, 222. Haxall's plantation, Va., 170. Heintzelman, General, mentioned, 140, 145, 186. Henry, Patrick, 10. Heth's division, 270. Hickory Hill, Va., 305. Hill, General Ambrose P., notice of, 47; mentioned, 104, 253, 260; killed, 378; described, 378. Hill, Benjamin, tribute to Lee, 418. Hill, General D. H., notice of, 47; mentioned, 140, 148, 172, 203, 205, 208. Hilton Head, 130. Hoke's brigade, 339. Holmes, General, 101, 133, 135, 160. Hood, General John B., 54, 203; at Gettysburg, 279, 280. Hooker, General, Joseph, notice of, 47, 48; mentioned, 188, 195, 205; succeeds Burnside, 2