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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 103 5 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 98 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 89 13 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 81 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 43 9 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 43 1 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 42 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 9 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 37 3 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 36 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Heth or search for Heth in all documents.

Your search returned 24 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
c struggle for independence. For instance, General Heth, in his letter in the October No., 1877,Jofder's, now commanded by Gen. Lane, and to order Heth's division, commanded by Pettigrew, and Lane's the enemy's lines. It is also evident that Gen. Heth had not read the report of General Lee, whic, with his wouuded hand in a sling, did advance Heth's division, and that very gallantly. After suc rear of its right to protect that flank; while Heth's division moved forward on Pickett's left in e right. This statement does great injustice to Heth's division, under Pettigrew, as the line was nereet ordered me to form in rear of the right of Heth's division, commanded by General Pettigrew. Soxt day the Light division was consolidated with Heth's, and the whole being put under the command ofwere ordered to resume our march, the troops of Heth's division that occupied the breastworks in ourfter General Thomas, but was soon halted by General Heth's order, and subsequently male to take posi[8 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Our Gettysburg series. (search)
so impressive that if I were professor of military science, I would choose the battle of Gettysburg for the special study of my students. My personal impressions about the poor result of the battle of Gettysburg have been exactly expressed by Gen'l Heth, whose letter I fully endorse. But he, as well as the other writers, has omitted one element which seems to me to be of the highest importance. I refer to the individual character of Gen'l Lee. I have made the military character of this Gene accustomed calmness, for then he saw clearly and handled the army with that masterly ability which was peculiar to him. This uneasiness during the days of the battle was contagious to the army, as will appear from the reports of Longstreet, Hood, Heth, and others, and as appeared also to me from the peep I had of the battle-field. What a difference from the systematic advance of the army from the Wilderness to the assault of the breastworks at Chancellorsville, where a unity of disposition and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A review of the First two days operations at Gettysburg and a reply to General Longstreet by General Fitz. Lee. (search)
mounted to 586, (Early's review of Gettysburg, December number of Southern iHistorical Society Papers, 1877, page 257,) leaving him still about 4,500 fighting men. Heth says, (see his paper in Philadelphia Times, September 22d, 1877,) he went into that fight with 7,000 muskets, and lost 2,700 men killed and wounded. lie was stillront Royal, accompanied by its artillery battalions, viz.: Lieut.-Colonel Ga'rnett's, Major Poague's, and Lieutenant-Colonel Cutt's, attending the divisions of Generals Heth, Pender, and Anderson, and Majors McIntosh's and Pegram's battalions as a corps reserve. In this advance, general headquarters being with the First corps, mnal cannon shots in that direction were heard by myself and others with the main body, as, before noon, we crossed the mountain. Two divisions of the Third corps, Heth's and Pender's, the former with Pegram's artillery battalion, the latter with McIntosh's, were in advance on this road; while of the Second corps, Early's division
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Remarks on the numerical strength of both armies at Gettysburg (search)
rts. I have picked out the following figures from the statement of Confederate officers: Four regiments: Present, 1,420; average per regiment, 372; present for duty,--; average per regiment,--. Benning's brigade. Eighteen regiments: Present, 6,471; average per regiment, 360; present for duty, 5,638; average per regiment, 313. Early's division, with one battery of artillery. Seventeen regiments: Present, 7,000; average per regiment, 412; present for dnty,--; average per regiment,--. Heth's division. Fifteen regiments: Present,--; average per regiment,--; present for duty, 4,484; average per regiment, 299. Pickett's division. Fifty-three regiments: Present,--; average per regiment,--; present for duty, 17,500; average per regiment, 330. First corps. It will be seen that the average of the men present for duty in Early's division is exactly the average between the two other figures (299 and 330); we can take it, therefore, as the real standard of the regimental streng