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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 103 5 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 98 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 89 13 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 81 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 43 9 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 43 1 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 42 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 9 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 37 3 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 36 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative. You can also browse the collection for Heth or search for Heth in all documents.

Your search returned 49 results in 7 document sections:

Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 15: Chancellorsville (search)
ons17,6499 Brigades1872 2D corps, Jackson's A. P. Hill's10,400Heth, Thomas, Lane, McGowans, Archer, Pender626 Rodes's9,632Rodes, Colquill had deployed Pender on the left of the pike. Lane, McGowan, and Heth were coming in column down the pike. Archer and Thomas were followi In his first assault, however, Hill's division, now commanded by Heth, after a terrific exchange of musketry, succeeded in driving the Fedaten the enemy upon that flank. Two hours after sunrise on the 4th, Heth arrived with three brigades to relieve Anderson, who was now orderedwith his three brigades from the River road, after being relieved by Heth. Anderson was in no way to blame for the delay, but he should have Three out of six of the division staff fell. In Pender's brigade of Heth's division, six out of ten field-officers were killed or wounded. OALSTREN. Headquarters, 2d Corps235 Headquarters, 1st Div.224 Va. Heth's Brig.44259303 S. C. McGowan's Brig. From Report of Surgeon Gui
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 16: Gettysburg: the first day (search)
erson7,440Wilcox, Wright, Mahone, Perry, Posey Heth7,500Pettigrew, Brockenbrough, Archer, Davis Pest in time to anticipate Pettigrew's brigade of Heth's division, which had been directed to visit Geh Pope in Aug., 1862. On June 29, Hill moved Heth's division from Fayetteville to Cashtown, about them. On the 30th, Pender's division followed Heth's from Fayetteville to Cashtown, and was followbeen as follows: About 10 A. M., the advance of Heth's division became engaged with Buford's cavalry Pender's division in line of battle in rear of Heth, but it was held in reserve for some time, as HHeth about noon received a reinforcement by the arrival of Rodes's division, on his left flank, coinictual points of contact, where only Rodes's and Heth's divisions were yet engaged. And, whether fro Confederate brigades were seriously crippled. Heth's division, which had already suffered severelyt of the 11th corps; and when Pender reinforced Heth against the 1st corps. The enemy was forced ba[3 more...]
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 17: Gettysburg: second day (search)
nderson with a message on the subject. Anderson ordered Posey to send forward two regiments as skirmishers. Later Posey speaks of supporting his skirmishers with his remaining regiments; but as his casualties in the whole campaign were but 12 killed and 71 wounded, evidently his brigade was not seriously engaged, and the whole attack was allowed to terminate with that of Wright. Neither Hill nor Anderson give any explanation. Hill had still unengaged and close at hand Mahone's brigade and Heth's division in reserve. Wright's report is of special interest as his advance was over the same ground covered the next day by the charge of Pickett's division. His report thus describes it after he had carried the enemy's advanced line, capturing several guns, crossed the pike, and approached the stone wall marking Pickett's farthest advance in his charge on the 3d. We were now within less than 100 yards of the crest of the heights, which were lined with artillery, supported by a stro
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 18: Gettysburg: third day (search)
day previous from the same cause and he now deemed it necessary to defend his flank and rear by the divisions of Hood and McLaws. He was, therefore, reenforced by Heth's division and two of Pender's brigades to the command of which Trimble was assigned. Pender had been mortally wounded in the artillery duel of Hill's corps durskirmished with our rear-guard and picked up stragglers. In one of these skirmishes, a small body of Federal cavalry was allowed to approach within 200 yards of Heth's division under Pettigrew, who supposed them to be our own cavalry bringing up the rear. These, however, had passed without giving notice that they were the last27183 Lane's Arty.321630 Anderson's Div.1471,1288402,115 Pettigrew1909151,105 Brockenbrough251 123148 Archer16144517677 Davis180717897 Garnett's Arty.51722 Heth's Div.4111,9055342,850 Perrin100477577 Lane41348389 Thomas16136152 Scales102323110535 Poague's Arty.224632 Pender's Div.2621,3121161,690 McIntosh's Arty.725
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 20: battle of the Wilderness (search)
R. H.PerrinMahoneHarrisWrightWalker, L. Perry HethDavisKirklandCookeWalker, H. A.80 Guns Archer tre of Grant's line. Hill's advanced division, Heth, encamped at Mine Run, about 13 miles from his en, was ordered to attack Hill's two divisions, Heth and Wilcox, of about 7000 each. Hancock, thoe whole weight of his corps into an attack upon Heth. Hill soon found that Wilcox's line was not as it was necessary to bring it to the support of Heth. At first Wilcox passed to the front and made arlow's division from the force about to attack Heth, and post it on his left, on the Brock road, in Getty's divisions advanced simultaneously upon Heth and Wilcox, who made a strong resistance until strike Hancock's three divisions on the flank. Heth had crossed the Po, some distance below our lefs division of the 9th was now ordered to attack Heth's line, at a favorable point where a pine thickpaign, there were also wounded Gen. Kirkland of Heth's division and Lane of Wilcox's. Also, on the 3[13 more...]
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 22: the Mine (search)
, Kershaw even advanced against Sheridan's cavalry and forced it to retreat. It took a position behind a ridge, where it dismounted a considerable force armed with the Spencer magazine carbines. Kershaw unwisely attempted a charge and was quickly repulsed, losing 250 prisoners and two colors. On hearing of Hancock's crossing on the morning of the 27th, and that prisoners had been captured from the 2d, 10th, and 18th corps, Lee immediately sent over W. H. F. Lee's division of cavalry and Heth's infantry of Hill's corps. Later in the day, he arranged to have Field's division of infantry withdrawn from his trenches at dark, to follow during the night, and Fitz-Lee's cavalry the next morning. President Davis was also advised, and on the 29th the Local Defence troops in Richmond were called out to the defence of the Richmond lines. These troops were never called out except in the gravest emergencies, which indicates the importance Lee attached to the demonstration. But it was on
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 23: the fall of 1864 (search)
and by Lee in June, 1863. He kept his cavalry moving and acting with his infantry instead of sending it off on a raid, having suspended on the 29th orders of the previous day to move against the railroads. It is noticeable, too, that Grant, on this occasion, concentrated practically his entire force in the attack upon our right, whereas, in the fall, he had never attacked upon one flank without some demonstration, at least, upon the other. On the 30th, Wilcox's division on the north, and Heth's on the south, of Hatchers Run had sharp affairs with the approaching Federals, whom they went out to meet in some cases, but were finally driven back within their lines. The Federal losses for the day were 1780. There are no returns for ours. Meanwhile, Lee was bringing up Pickett's and Johnson's divisions of infantry, about 6600 men, and two of Lee's divisions of cavalry, about 5760 men, for an expedition against Sheridan. They attacked him on the 31st, and drove him back in much co