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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 102 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 99 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 63 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 53 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 52 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 44 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 44 4 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 32 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 18 0 Browse Search
Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 17 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Henry Heth or search for Henry Heth in all documents.

Your search returned 50 results in 9 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chancellorsville-report of Major-General Stuart. (search)
ded immediately to the front, which I reached at 10 P. M. I found, upon reaching it, A. P. Hill's division in front, under Heth, with Lane's, McGowan's, Archer's and Heth's brigades on the right of the road, within half a mile of Chancellorsville, neHeth's brigades on the right of the road, within half a mile of Chancellorsville, near the apex of the ridge, and Pender's and Thomas' on the left. I found that the enemy had made an attack on our right flank, but were repulsed. The fact, however, that the attack was made, and at night, made me apprehensive of a repetition of it, ency when he did join me. Our losses were heavy; the enemy's heavier. In Sunday's battle, Brigadier-Generals Ramseur, Heth and McGowan were wounded, and Paxton killed. Heth and Ramseur, though painfully wounded, persisted in retaining command tHeth and Ramseur, though painfully wounded, persisted in retaining command to the close of the fight. Their heroic conduct will be specially mentioned in the report proper. The casualties of the corps I have not the means of knowing, as, before the returns were completed, I relinquished the command to Major-General A. P. H
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Defence of batteries Gregg and Whitworth, and the Evacuation of Petersburg. (search)
eding April second. Early in October, 1864, Heth's division and two brigades, Lane's and McGowanWhite Oak road. 10 P. M., McCrae's brigade, of Heth's division, and McGowan's brigade, of my divisiThese brigades had moved under direction of General Heth. The march was toilsome and fatiguing, theso heavy and threatening about the mill that Gen. Heth sent to me for a brigade, I being in charge 1, 1865. Gen. Wilcox, Commanding, &c. : Maj.-Gen. Heth directs me to say that you must not comprotween two evils, each equally dangerous; we, Gen. Heth and myself, were too weak to support the onewith Cooke's, Davis',--and McComb's brigades of Heth's division, and Lane's and Thomas' of my divisi troops were withdrawn, and successfully, by Gen. Heth, moving to the rear by the right flank, and etired from this point: Cook's and McCrae's, of Heth's division, and McGowan's and Scale's, of my diLee, in the presence of General Longstreet, General Heth and myself, sitting on the portico of Capta
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Causes of the defeat of Gen. Lee's Army at the battle of Gettysburg-opinions of leading Confederate soldiers. (search)
at last it was made, the attacking column consisted of Pickett's and Heth's divisions, the latter under Pettigrew, (Heth having been wounded tHeth having been wounded two days before). Behind Pickett's right marched Wilcox's brigade, and Pettigrew's support consisted of Lane's and Scales', brigadiers under Geals Longstreet, Hood, Anderson and Early, and Major-Generals McLaws, Heth, Wilcox and Trimble; General Pendleton, chief of artillery; Generalst; and to stregthen him for the movement, he was to be reinforced~by Heth's division and two brigades of Pender's, of Hill's corps. These, wiovements. The attack was not made as designed. Pickett's division, Heth's division, and two brigades of Pender's division advanced. Hood an those of Early, Rodes and Johnson; and the Third those of Anderson, Heth and Pender. The last two divisions of Hill's corps were formed b of artillery of Ewell's corps; General Wilcox, of Hill's corps; General Heth, of Hill's corps; and others who were in position to know, and w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Causes of the Confederate defeat at Gettysburg. (search)
up, who afterwards wrote a very graphic account of the battle and of incidents occurring here, which was published in Blackwood's Magazine. A little before this, Heth's division, under Pettigrew, had been advanced also, but I cannot recall the moment or the place where I saw them, but only the impression on my mind, as the men p, but he determined, with the view of guarding his communications with Virginia and to check the advance west, to concentrate his forces east of the mountains. Heth's division, of Hill's corps, was moved over the mountain to Cashtown, eight miles west of Gettysburg, on the 29th. The next day Pender's division, of the same corps, followed, and one of Heth's brigades, ordered to Gettysburg to get supplies, finding the enemy there and not knowing his strength, returned. Report of this was made by General Hill to both Generals Lee and Ewell. Anderson's division, of Hill's corps, and Longstreet, with Hood's and McLaws' divisions, moved July 1st towards
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Second paper by Colonel Walter H. Taylor, of General Lee's staff. (search)
hat point, and who reported that the advance of Heth's division had encountered the cavalry of the e Gettysburg. Instructions had been sent to General Heth to ascertain what force was at Gettysburg, artillery were present in considerable force. Heth's division was already hotly engaged, and it wa had meanwhile been advanced to relieve that of Heth; and Rodes, observing the effect of Early's atteet's corps, was then up, fresh and available. Heth's division, of Hill's corps, was also mentioned him. Orders were sent to General Hill to place Heth's division and two brigades of Pender's at Genewere the divisions of Pickett (First corps) and Heth (Third corps)-the latter, since the wounding of, that the erroneous report was circulated that Heth's division was assigned the duty of supporting rigades of Lane and Scales acted as supports to Heth's division. General Lane, in his report, says: rear of its right to protect that flank; while Heth's division moved forward on Pickett's left in e[6 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
wer its purpose, I am, respectfully yours, J. B. Hood. Witnesses: H. B. Deas, R. J. Deas. Letter from Major-General Henry Heth, of A. P. Hill's corps, A. N. V. [The following letter from General Heth was originally addressed to the SecrGeneral Heth was originally addressed to the Secretary of our Society, and was duly forwarded to our distinguished foreign correspondent, whose letter of enquiry to us called it forth. It has been recently published in the Philadelphia Times, but will be none the less acceptable to our readers ers to countermarch and concentrate on Hill's corps, which lay on and at the base of South Mountain; the leading division (Heth's) occupying Cashtown, at the base of the mountain; the cavalry not heard from, probably at or near Carlisle. Hearing thazed the plans of the greatest of American soldiers in his seven days fights around Richmond, his discomfiture of Pope, his Chancellorsville fight, and his series of battles in 1864, from the Wilderness to Cold Harbor. Yours truly, Henry Heth.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Field telegrams from Headquarters A. N. V. (search)
mportant to get troops to Petersburg without delay. R. E. Lee, General. Official: W. H. Taylor, A. A. G. Headquarters Army N. Va., June 18th, 1864. General J. A. Early, Lynchburg, Va: Grant is in front of Petersburg. Will be opposed there. Strike as quick as you can, and, if circumstances authorize, carry out the original plan, or move upon Petersburg without delay. R. E. Lee. Petersburg, June 21, 1864. Brigadier-General G. W. C. Lee, Chaffin's Bluff: 10:34 A. M.-What is supposed strength of enemy's force reported on Kingsland road, and of what composed? Cooke's brigade is at Clay's House available, to be sent if you need assistance, and directed to be prepared to move, if ordered, either by rail or march by land. In absence of General Lee, W. H. Taylor, A. A. G. Dunn's Mill, June 22, 1864. General Heth: Inform me of the state of affairs in your front, and whether Cook's and Davis' brigades are needed on that side of the river. R. E. Lee, General.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
o suspend our publications. We only desired to advise our friends of our need of prompt payment of their dues in order to enable us to meet our obligations and carry out important plans for making our Papers more valuable than ever. But we would repeat with emphasis, that those who intend to become Life Members-to raise us clubs of new subscribers-or to help us in any way-are not likely to find in the future a time when they can do so more acceptably to the Society. Our Gettysburg series is still exciting the deepest interest in every quarter. We have letters from our distinguished foreign correspondent expressing his very high appreciation of the interest and value of these papers. We will be glad to have additional papers from anybody who knows anything about the great battle worth publishing. Errata.-On page 109, (Sept. No.), Heth's division under Pettigrew, should read Wilcox's command, and so Pettigrew should read Wilcox. For ripoote, page 110, read riposte.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
lisher, Colonel Taylor puts General Lee's strength at Gettysburg at 62,000 effectives, and his estimate is repeated by General Heth, whereas I put it at something under 60,000. This variance is caused by the fact that he includes in his estimate theon equally applicable to Gen. Hill, and, in fact, to General Lee-for, as shown by the statements of Colonel Taylor and General Heth, he was on the field in full time to direct all the movements looking to a pursuit and the realization of the Jegitimavation on that day, and my own part therein. It is only necessary to refer to the well-known facts that the advance of Heth's division on the road from Cashtown, supported by Pender's, had brought on the engagement, and that Rodes, who had campedefore, and was on his way to Cashtown, came down on the road from Mummasburgh about 2 o'clock P. M., and became engaged on Heth's left. I arrived about an hour after Rodes got up. I had marched from about three miles from Heidlersburg in the directi