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The Daily Dispatch: December 25, 1865., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 13, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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George Hickman, a Philadelphia lawyer, has been sentenced to six months imprisonment for stealing $45 worth of books from a public library. The authorities of Boston have determined to have two balloon ascensions from the Common, on the 4th of July, at an expense of $1,000. A. G. Parker, convicted in Washington co., Va., of obtaining money on false pretences, has been sentenced to 2 ½ years in the penitentiary. Rev. Mr. Foster, of the Methodist Conference, died in Tazewell co., Va., a few days since. Dr. James Crabtree, who has been postmaster at Tumbling creek, Washington co., Va., more than thirty years, died last week. A number of recruits for the Southern Army left Portsmouth. Va., yesterday morning, for Charleston. Hon. A. H. Boteler, of Virginia, announces himself and independent Union candidate for re-election to Congress.
addition to the protracted hearing of the case of Mrs. Isabella Ould, a detail of which is elsewhere given, the Mayor disposed of the following business: George Hickman was charged with stealing turkeys in the market. The gentleman from whom the fowls were stolen could not swear that Hickman was the man who took them, althouHickman was the man who took them, although he missed them from his wagon.-- There being no evidence sufficiently positive to justify the detention of Hickman, he was discharged. James Smith, a youthful vagabond of some twelve years, was charged with having been drunk and disorderly in the streets. He had a white woolen comforter wound around his head in the place oHickman, he was discharged. James Smith, a youthful vagabond of some twelve years, was charged with having been drunk and disorderly in the streets. He had a white woolen comforter wound around his head in the place of a cap. No one appeared to testify against him, and he was released with the usual admonition. Smith left the court-room with such an erect and soldier-like mein as to cause a hearty laugh among the spectators. Frank Smith, another boy of about the same age, with a dirty face and closely-cropped hair, was also charged with h