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The Daily Dispatch: February 25, 1862., [Electronic resource] 17 17 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 12 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 12, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 8 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 6, 1863., [Electronic resource] 7 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 25, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 4 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 11, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott). You can also browse the collection for Hickman or search for Hickman in all documents.

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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), May 2-9, 1862.-expedition from Trenton to Paris and Dresden, Tenn., with skirmish, May 5, near Lockridge's Mill. (search)
eived Mrs. Cowan by passing for a Federal officer, and got certain intelligence that James Allen had brought the news to Major Shaeffer that a force of nearly 3,000 was passing up to Paris; he instantly sent off on the fastest horses couriers to Hickman, Mayfield, Paducah, and elsewhere, that all the neighborhood had gone, and much more not necessary to relate. I got all her news, and then her negro boy William was even more confidential toward a supposed Abolitionist. I saw that my plans werrm of Mr. Erwin. There a report was made by a citizen coming from Caledonia that a large force of Confederate cavalry had passed, going toward Paris, which induced Major Shaeffer [de Boernstein] to go to Dresden and possibly toward Mayfield and Hickman. We made a night march on a very dark and stormy night, and reached Dresden at about 1 a. m. Pickets were sent out toward Como, which reported (very late) that the enemy had his pickets at our last camping place-Erwin's farm. We left Dresde
e river, which attacked and drove in our pickets. Our work must have been discovered by them, and it would be charging them with gross stupidity not to suppose our plan betrayed; besides, on Friday morning a heavy rain set in, which of itself would have rendered a delay of at least two days necessary in the prosecution of our work. In the mean time rumors were reaching me of the concentration of a strong rebel force in the vicinity of Trenton, for the object, it was reported, of attacking Hickman and Columbus. As these rumors were confirmed by the refugees from the conscription, and as I saw no good that could be accomplished by remaining longer at the flotilla, I started back with my command on Friday afternoon, and the troops are now distributed in the district as they were before the expedition sailed. In conclusion, permit me to express the opinion that with a properlyorganized force of 5,000 men I doubt not the easy, and perhaps bloodless, capture of Forts Pillow and Rando