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The Daily Dispatch: February 25, 1862., [Electronic resource] 17 17 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 12 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 12, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 8 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 6, 1863., [Electronic resource] 7 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 25, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 4 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 11, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 6, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Hickman or search for Hickman in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: May 6, 1863., [Electronic resource], What of the odds?--"Twenty Millions against Eight" (search)
s?--"Twenty Millions against Eight" This was the policy of insurance upon which the Yankees adventured into this war.-- "Twenty millions can whip eight," said Hickman, of Pennsylvania, whom Harry Edmundson slapped and kicked for his insults to the South in the Capitol Square at Washington. Hickman paid us of the South the compHickman paid us of the South the compliment that we were of the same race with his people of the North--as good, but no better; and the afore to be overcome by superior numbers. Like all Yankees, he was full of conceit of himself and his folk, and could pay us no greater tribute, in his estimation, than to say we were all alike! Hickman furnished the cue to all the Hickman furnished the cue to all the rest. They have all been harping on the difference in numbers as a sure sign of the result. Boasting of the advantage they have in more numbers, they are nevertheless actively engaged in enlisting Irish and German emigrants to help them to whip us. They have, by their bribes and promises, increased the emigration from abroad very
hat place. The chief participators in this affair were the Forty fifth Massachusetts and the Fifty eighth Pennsylvania regiments. Skirmishing to a great extent had been going on in the vicinities of Newbern and Washington. The enemy have been repulsed at every point, and considerable numbers of rebels prisoners have been taken and sent into Newbern. General Hill is supposed to be at Goldsboro', with a portion of the forces with which he lately invested Newbern and Washington. Gen. Hickman forwards his official report of the march of his forces to Washington and the operations there. The news from the Southwest is most important. By the arrival of a steamer at Cairo yesterday, from Milliken's Bend, we are informed that nearly the whole of our army at that point was in motion, leaving tents and baggage behind, and the soldiers taking six days rations. It is stated, on what is considered reliable authority, that Gen. Osterbans occupied Grand Gulf. Two tugs, having i