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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
lism, the latter was really a form of Neoplatonism directly descended from the Cambridge platonism of More and Cudworth. Hickok's Rational psychology (1848) is our only philosophic work of the first two-thirds of the nineteenth century to show any direct and serious assimilation of Kant's thought. Hickok, however, professes to reject the whole transcendental philosophy, and, in the main, the Kantian elements in his system are no larger than in the writings of British thinkers like Hamilton andod of authority; and in spite of many acute minds like Bowen, Mahan, Bledsoe, or Tappan, or powerful minds like Shedd and Hickok, Soldier, lawyer, minister, publicist, and editor, as well as professor of mathematics, Albert T. Bledsoe deserves to thought of Spencer or Darwin. For sheer intellectual power, however, and for comprehensive grasp of technical philosophy Hickok is easily the foremost figure in American philosophy between the time of Jonathan Edwards and the period of the Civil War
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
, 286 Henry, Joseph, 233 Henry St. John, gentleman, 67 Hephzibah Guinness, 90 Herald (N. Y.), 168, 320, 321, 322 Herald of the New-found World, the, 437 Herbart, 240 Her great Match, 283 Her husband's wife, 294 Hermann, J. G. J., 460, 461, 462 Hermann, K. F., 462 Herndon, William L., 136 Herne, James A., 266, 278, 279, 280, 285 Heroines of fiction, 83 Heron, Matilda, 271 Herrick, 38 Heyse, 462 Hiawatha, 604 Hichborn, 365 Hickman, Bill, 143, 151 Hickok, 228, 229, 229 n. Hicks, 39 H. H. See Jackson, Helen Hunt High Chin Bob, 161 Higher criticism of the Pentateuch, the, 207 High plateaus of Utah, the, 159 Higginson, T. W., 32, 33, 109, 113, 116 119-20, 344, 472 Hildeburn, 535 Hildreth, Richard, 71, 178, 438 Hilgard, E. W., 585 Hill, A. S., 312 Hilquit, Morris, 600 Hilt to Hilt, 67 Hirth, F., 585 Histoire de toutes des rues de la Nouvelle-Orleans, 593 Historical essays, 199 Historical magazine, the, 17
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.70 (search)
ront, and Pennington's Brigade of mounted cavalry in my rear. I cannot close without adding that when I ordered, in a loud tone, my regiment to surrender, several of Pennington's cavalry made a dash for my colors. That brave and glorious man, Hickok, my color sergeant, drew his pistol and began firing on them, asking: What did you say, Colonel Hutters? I repeated my order, but Hickok, dear fellow, had been shot down, and I thought killed, but God be praised, I hear he still lives, an honoreid you say, Colonel Hutters? I repeated my order, but Hickok, dear fellow, had been shot down, and I thought killed, but God be praised, I hear he still lives, an honored citizen of Botetourt, his native county. No braver man ever bore the colors of his country on the field of battle, and even at this late day I waft him a well done. I have not seen him since Five Forks. His division loved him and would have followed him anywhere. J. Risque Hutter, Formerly Colonel 11th Virginia Infantry.