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Lydia Maria Child, Isaac T. Hopper: a true life 37 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 4 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 4 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. 4 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hicks, Elias 1748- (search)
Hicks, Elias 1748- Friends preacher; born in Hempstead, N. Y., March 19, 1748; was a very able preacher among Friends, or Quakers, and was a formally recognized minister at the age of twenty-seven. After preaching many years, he embraced Unitarian views, and boldly promulgated them. This produced a schism in the society, and a separation, the new lights receiving the name of Hicksites, and the old church of Orthodox. They have never fused. He preached with eloquence and vigor until a short time before his death, in Jericho, N. Y., Feb. 27, 1830. See friends, Society of.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hopper, Isaac Tatem 1771-1852 (search)
Hopper, Isaac Tatem 1771-1852 Philanthropist; born in Gloucester county, N. J., Dec. 3. 1771; accepted the Quaker faith early in life, and later adhered to the doctrines promulgated by Elias Hicks, whose followers became known as Hicksites. As a member of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society he often protected the negro people of Philadelphia from the slave kidnappers who infested that city. Later he became widely known through his efforts for the reform of convicts, and lived to see an asylum established by his daughter, Mrs. Abby H. Gibbons, in behalf of these unfortunates, and named in his honor the Isaac T. Hopper home. He died in New York City, May 7, 1852.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
r even, Smiles the reviled and pelted Stephen, S. S. Foster. The unappeasable Boanerges To all the Churches and the Clergies, The grim savant who, to complete His own peculiar cabinet, Contrived to label with his kicks One from the followers of Hicks; Elias Hicks. Who studied mineralogy Not with soft book upon the knee, But learned the properties of stones By contact sharp of flesh and bones, And made the experimentum crucis With his own body's vital juices: A man with caoutchouc enduranceElias Hicks. Who studied mineralogy Not with soft book upon the knee, But learned the properties of stones By contact sharp of flesh and bones, And made the experimentum crucis With his own body's vital juices: A man with caoutchouc endurance, A perfect gem for life insurance, A kind of maddened John the Baptist, To whom the harshest word comes aptest, Who, struck by stone or brick ill-starred, Hurls back an epithet as hard, Which, deadlier than stone or brick, Has a propensity to stick. His oratory is like the scream Of the iron horse's phrenzied steam Which warns the world to leave wide space For the black engine's swerveless race. Ye men with neckcloths white, I warn you— I. e., the clergy. Habet a whole haymow in cornu. A Ju
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, The woman's rights movement and its champions in the United States. (search)
fter an absence of three hours there we sat in the same spot, having seen nothing but each other, wholly absorbed in questions of theology and social life. She had told me of the doctrines and divisions among Quakers, of the inward light, of Elias Hicks, of Channing, of a religion of life, and of Mary Wollstonecraft and her social theories. I had been reading Combe's Constitution of Man, and Moral Philosophy, and Channing's Works, and had already thought on all these questions; but I had nevght, and had no faith in the generally received idea of human depravity. My sympathy was early enlisted for the poor slave, by the class-books read in our schools, and the pictures of the slave-ship, as published by Clarkson. The ministry of Elias Hicks and others, on the subject of the unrequited labor of slaves, and their example in refusing the products of slave labor, all had their effect in awakening a strong feeling in their behalf. The unequal condition of woman in society also early
Lydia Maria Child, Isaac T. Hopper: a true life, Contents. (search)
ed, 245. The puzzled Dutchman, 245. Hint to an Untidy Neighbor, 247. Resemblance to Napoleon, 248, 314. The Dress, Manners, and Character of Sarah, his wife, 249 to 252, 382, 466. The Devil's Lane, 254. Jacob Lindley's Anecdotes, 256. Singular Clairvoyance of Arthur Howell, a Quaker Preacher, 258. Prophetic Presentiment of his Mother, 262. The aged Bondman emancipated, 264. A Presentiment of Treachery, 266. The Quaker who purchased a Stolen Horse, 270. Elias Hicks and the Schism in the Society of Friends, 273 to 286. Pecuniary difficulties, 287 to 291. Death of his Wife, 291. Death of his son Isaac, 292. Journey to Maryland, and Testimony against Slavery, 293. His marriage with Hannah Attmore, 294. Removes to New-York, 296. Matthew Carey's facetious Letter of Introduction, 296. Anecdotes of his visit to England and Ireland, 296 to 313. Anecdote of the Diseased Horse, 302. Visit to William Penn's Grave, 309. The Stor
Lydia Maria Child, Isaac T. Hopper: a true life, The two young offenders. (search)
nion among early Friends, that the right of Elias Hicks to utter his own convictions, whether they ore on individual freedom. The friends of Elias Hicks did not adopt his views or the views of anyling. But it was not the Unitarianism of Elias Hicks that his adherents fought for, or consideret into open manifestation by a sermon which Elias Hicks preached against the use of slave produce, tinct sects. In some places the friends of Elias Hicks were far the more numerous. In others, hisight to retain the title. The opponents of Elias Hicks called themselves Orthodox Friends, and nams were Orthodox; and when he took part with Elias Hicks, they ceased to patronize him. He was per. t his religious opinions resembled those of Elias Hicks. But I judged so mainly from incidental re of the schism produced by the preaching of Elias Hicks. Fourteen years had elapsed since the sepafforts made to sustain our much beloved brother Elias Hicks, against those who were anxious for his[8 more...]
d because most of the conversations at the meetings are neither interesting nor instructive, much of it being what is called gossip. She and her husband both took part in the momentous Separation among Friends, some following the teachings of Elias Hicks, others remaining Orthodox. This took place in or near 1827. During this time, from about 1820-1830, James Mott was engaged in the domestic commission business, including the sale of cotton, then considered a legitimate article of merchandise, even by anti-slavery people. It was a popular and very profitable business. But the powerful preaching of Elias Hicks against any voluntary participation with slavery was arousing Friends to an understanding of the subject, and led many to unite with him in abstinence from the products of slave labor. James and Lucretia Mott resolved, so far as their household was concerned, to make things honest in this respect. This involved many daily discomforts and annoyances and not a few sacrifice