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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 13: the Bible Convention.—1853. (search)
o-called World's Temperance Convention had been held in that city, under the customary clerical auspices, and, though Lib. 23:[84]; Hist. Woman Suffrage, 1.499. consenting at first to admit certificated delegates from the Women's State Temperance Society, was convulsed by a motion to place one of them on the business committee. A hearing was refused to the women themselves, and they were finally excluded, as not contemplated in the call. A secession accordingly took place, led by the Rev. T. W. Higginson of Worcester, Mass. A fall meeting having been arranged for the same misnamed Convention, on September 6, 7, a counter Whole World's Temperance Convention was projected for September 1, 2, and Mr. Garrison was naturally among the signers of Lib. 23.115. the latter call. He took a very subordinate part in the Ms. Sept. 5, 1853, W. L. G. to H. E. G.; Lib. 23.146. proceedings, in which the women were of right conspicuous. Few of the clergy were visible, and no dignitaries. On th
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 14: the Nebraska Bill.—1854. (search)
More practical was the incorporation, first in Massachusetts, of Emigrant Aid Lib. 24.62, 74, 115. associations to pour free-State settlers into Kansas and Nebraska, slavery having the shortest cut to the scene of competition. Yet, as the Rev. T. W. Higginson asked, in a sermon to Lib. 24.95. his Worcester flock announcing a Revolution begun, of what use was it to make of Nebraska a transplanted Massachusetts, when Massachusetts herself had been miserably wanting to the cause of freedom? short of violent resistance to the rendition of Burns; how a magnanimous attack was simultaneously Not consequently. The attack was planned deliberately, cautiously, and (as the almost success proved) most judiciously (Ms. June 28, 1854, T. W. Higginson to W. L. G.). made upon the Lib. 28.43. Court house, ending in repulse and in the death of one of the deputy marshals; how President Pierce and the Mayor J. V. C. Smith. of Boston concentrated all the military within reach to prevent a s
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 15: the Personal Liberty Law.—1855. (search)
uled the nation? Will the young men take their stand, and throw off this incubus? I say, Mr. Chairman, let us strike for revolution. Let us drive slavery from our soil, and never allow a man to be put on trial on the question whether he is a man or a beast. How long shall this last? I hope to live to see the hour of triumph; and as I mark the spirit that pervades this assembly, I can hardly help crying out, Hallelujah! A comparatively new-comer in the anti-slavery ranks, the Rev. T. W. Higginson, who followed Mr. Wright, saw and expressed the tendency of current events with a distinctness close akin to prophecy: It is good for us to have been here, Sir. I have felt it almost Lib. 25.175. every moment of the afternoon; and when I have looked around this hall, and seen alternately the smiles upon the lips of noble women, and the tears in the eyes of brave men,—seen them as well as I could for the closer tears that dimmed my own,—I have felt the same hope with the last
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 17: the disunion Convention.—1857. (search)
n held at Worcester under the auspices of T. W. Higginson and other residents of that city. Anothepation might already have been achieved. T. W. Higginson thanked the abolitionists of Massachusettwas issued by citizens of Worcester, with T. W. Higginson and Thomas Earle at their head— Bele Republican Party. Lib. 27.19. Nor could Mr. Higginson have been surprised. At the anti-slavery slave one hour after the deed is done! Mr. Higginson reported the resolutions of the Lib. 27.1 propaganda of the new movement. Of this, Mr. Higginson was made chairman. A general convention o in July. It was Lib. 27.118. signed by T. W. Higginson, Wendell Phillips, Daniel Mann, A Bostfection and fidelity to the Union. Rev. T. W. Higginson to W. L. Garrison. Worcester, August at Cleveland, on the 28th and 29th inst.,—Mr. Higginson, Mr. Phillips, and myself, after grave andld this month. Theodore Parker, Phillips, Higginson, etc., will send letters to the meeting at C
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 18: the irrepressible Conflict.—1858. (search)
avery ought to be a universal institution. The argument, I repeat, is with the slaveholder. At the same meeting, Mr. Higginson dwelt at length on T. W. Higginson. the new element coming to settle the question of slavery by-and-bye on the soil T. W. Higginson. the new element coming to settle the question of slavery by-and-bye on the soil where it exists. Probably no one who heard him could read John Brown between the lines. Sanborn's Life of John Brown, pp. 435, 440, 447, 457-460. Mr. Higginson spoke with knowledge when he asked— Is it [slavery] destined, as it began in blood, so Mr. Higginson spoke with knowledge when he asked— Is it [slavery] destined, as it began in blood, so to end? Seriously and solemnly I say, it seems as if it were. At the New England Convention in Boston on May 26, Theodore Parker (equally with Mr. Higginson a Ibid., pp. 440, 447, 458-460, 463, 511, 512; Weiss's Life of Parker, 2.161. confidantMr. Higginson a Ibid., pp. 440, 447, 458-460, 463, 511, 512; Weiss's Life of Parker, 2.161. confidant of John Brown, and fresh from meeting him with his secret committee of backers at the Revere House) reiterated his belief that the time had passed when the great American question of the nineteenth century could have been settled without bloodshed.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 19: John Brown.—1859. (search)
Virginia, and C. L. Vallandigham, a Democratic Representative from Ohio. This report not only saved Brown's wrecked enterprise from moral fiasco, but first made public his real purpose, which insurrection did not fairly describe. On this point Mr. Lib. 29.175, 198. Garrison had no secret information. His non-resistant views had marked him as an impossible confidant. At the Massachusetts Society's anniversary meeting on January Lib. 29.18. 27, 1859, he listened without suspicion to Mr. Higginson's mention of Brown's December raid from Kansas into Lib. 29.7, 18, 47, 55, 119; Sanborn's Life of Brown, p. 481. Missouri—carrying off eleven slaves, whom he conducted to Canada—as an indication of what may come before long; the speaker himself only alluding at that time to [Underground] Railroad business on a somewhat extended scale, Sanborn's Brown, p. 436. to use Brown's own words to him. The nearest Mr. Garrison had come to accidental cognizance of Brown's designs, was the receipt,