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Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 261 5 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 47 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 36 18 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 36 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 22 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment 21 1 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 21 7 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 19 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 18 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Thomas Wentworth Higginson or search for Thomas Wentworth Higginson in all documents.

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 10: the wider outlookv1865; aet. 46 (search)
lf again, reading Kant and Livy, teaching the children, and gathering mussels on the beach. She flits up to town to see the new statue of Horace Mann, in order to criticise it for Chev's pamphlet ; Dr. Howe raised the money for this statue. meets William Hunt, who praises its simplicity and parental character; and Charles Sumner, who tells her it looks better on a nearer view. The day after--we abode in the Valley, when three detachments of company tumbled in upon us, to wit, Colonel Higginson and Mrs. McKay, the Tweedys and John Field, and the Gulstons. All were friendly. Only on my speaking of the rudeness occasionally shown me by a certain lady, Mrs. Tweedy said: But that was in the presence of your superiors, was it not? I replied: I do not know that I was ever in Mrs. X.'s company under those circumstances! After which we all laughed. She was at this time sitting to Miss Margaret Foley for a portrait medallion and was writing philosophy and poetry. Family and ho
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 13: concerning clubs 1867-1871; aet. 48-52 (search)
er and of its affinity with things divine, which always gave the master tone to the discussions. She says elsewhere of the Radical Club:-- The really radical feature in it was the fact that the thoughts presented at its meetings had a root; were in that sense radical.... Here I have heard Wendell Phillips, and Oliver Wendell Holmes, John Weiss and James Freeman Clarke, Athanase Coquerel, the noble French Protestant preacher; William Henry Channing, worthy nephew of his great uncle; Colonel Higginson, Doctor Bartol, and many others. Extravagant things were sometimes said, no doubt, and the equilibrium of ordinary persuasion was not infrequently disturbed for a time. But the satisfaction of those present when a sound basis of thought was vindicated and established is indeed pleasant in remembrance.... To Dickens's second reading, which I enjoyed very much. The wreck in David Copperfield was finely given. His appearance is against success; the face is rather commonplace, seen
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 17: the woman's cause 1868-1910 (search)
t to our mother. The demand for it seemed unreasonable; she was inclined to laugh both at the cause and its advocates; yet when, in November, 1868, Colonel Thomas Wentworth Higginson asked her to give her name to a call for a meeting in behalf of woman suffrage she did not refuse. It would be a liberal and friendly meeting, the rder changed for her. On the platform were gathered the woman suffrage leaders, some of whom she already knew: William Lloyd Garrison, Wendell Phillips, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, James Freeman Clarke; veteran captains of Reform, her husband's old companions-in-arms. Looking in their steadfast faces, she felt that she belonged wgland Woman Suffrage Association issued a call for the formation of a national body; the names signed were Lucy Stone, Caroline M. Severance, Julia Ward Howe, T. W. Higginson, and G. H. Vibbert. Representatives from twenty-one States assembled in Cleveland, November 24, 1869, and formed the American Woman Suffrage Association. Th
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 3: Newport 1879-1882; aet. 60-63 (search)
nine years since she had had a house in Boston; in spite of her lameness, perhaps partly because of it, she enjoyed entertaining her family and friends. Mrs. Terry and her daughter spent part of the winter with them. The year 1880 was marked by the publication of her first book since Later Lyrics : a tiny volume entitled Modern Society, containing, beside the title essay, a kindred one on Changes in American Society. The Journal makes little or no mention of this booklet, but Thomas Wentworth Higginson says of it: It would be hard to find a book in American literature better worth reprinting and distributing.... In wit, in wisdom, in anecdote, I know few books so racy. January 1, 1881. I have now been lame for twelve weeks, in consequence of a bad fall which I had on October 17. I am still on crutches with my left knee in a splint. Have had much valuable leisure in consequence of this, but have suffered much inconvenience and privation of preaching, social intercourse, etc.
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 4:
241 Beacon Street
: the New Orleans Exposition 1883-1885; aet. 64-66 (search)
ford. There was need of these new friends, for old ones were growing fewer. Side by side in the Journal with the mention of this one or that comes more and more frequently the record of the passing of some dear companion on life's journey. Those who were left of the great band that made New England glorious in the nineteenth century held closely to each other, and the bond between them had a touching significance. Across the street lived Oliver Wendell Holmes; in Cambridge was Thomas Wentworth Higginson; in Dorchester, Edward Everett Hale. In a letter to her brother she speaks of the constant tear and trot of my Boston life, in which I try to make all ends meet, domestic, social, artistic, and reformatory, and go about, I sometimes think, like a poor spider who spins no web .... Marion has been very industrious, and is full of good work and of cheer. His book [ Mr. Isaacs ] has been such a success as to give him at once a recognized position, of which the best feature, economi
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 8: divers good causes 1890-1896; aet. 71-77 (search)
ing decade of the nineteenth century a new growth of causes claimed her time and sympathy. The year 1891 saw the birth of the Society of American Friends of Russian Freedom; modelled on a similar society which, with Free Russia as its organ, was doing good work in England. The object of the American society was to aid by all moral and legal means the Russian patriots in their efforts to obtain for their country political freedom and self-government. Its circular was signed by Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Julia Ward Howe, John Greenleaf Whittier, James Russell Lowell, George Kennan, William Lloyd Garrison, Henry I. Bowditch, F. W. Bird, Alice Freeman Palmer, Charles G. Ames, Edward L. Pierce, Frank B. Sanborn, Annie Fields, E. Benjamin Andrews, Lillie B. Chace Wyman, Samuel L. Clemens, and Joseph H. Twitchell. James Russell Lowell, writing to Francis J. Garrison in 1891, says: Between mote and beam, I think this time Russia has the latter in her eye, though God knows we have mot
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: eighty years 1899-1900; aet. 80-81 (search)
n 1899 appeared the reminiscences, on which she had been so long at work. These were even more warmly received, though many people thought them too short. Colonel Higginson said the work might have been spread out into three or four interesting octavos; but in her hurried grasp it is squeezed into one volume, where groups of delthe Club was duly organized. in January the Authors' Club made its first public appearance in a meeting and dinner at hotel Vendome, Mrs. Howe presiding, Colonel Higginson (whom she described as her chief vice ) beside her. the brilliant and successful course of the Authors' Club need not be dwelt on here. Her connection wiuotation from mother Goose [ when the pie was opened, etc.], and the first bird that I shall introduce will be Rev. E. E. Hale. beginning thus, I introduced T. W. Higginson as the great American Eagle; Judge [Robert] Grant as a mocking-bird; C. F. Adams as the trained German canary who sings all the songs of Yawcob Strauss; C. G.
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 12: Stepping westward 1901-1902; aet. 82-83 (search)
Club and love the world of my own time, so far as I know it. They called me Queen and kissed my hand. When I came home I fell in spirit before the feet of the dear God, thanking Him for the regard shown me, and praying that it might not for one moment make me vain. I read my translation of Horace's ode, Quis Desiderio, and it really seemed to suit the mention made by Mrs. Cheney of our departed members, praecipue, Dr. Zack; Dr. Hoder [?] of England was there, and ex-Governor Long and T. W. Higginson, also Agnes Irwin. It was a great time. July 5.... I wrote to Ethel V. Partridge, Omaha, a high-school student: Get all the education that you can. Cultivate habits of studious thought with all that books can teach. The fulfilment of the nearest duty gives the best education. I fear that I have come to know this by doing the exact opposite, i.e., neglecting much of the nearest duty in the pursuit of an intellectual wisdom which I have not attained.... Maud and Florence were bot
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 13: looking toward sunset 1903-1905; aet. 84-86 (search)
dd, at which every bard of that nation brought four lines of verse — a sort of four-leaved clover — to his chief. T. W. Higginson, The Outlook, January 26, 1907. Sixty quatrains made what she calls an astonishing testimonial of regard. Colonel with stanzas four; behold us here, each bearing verse in hand to greet the four-leaved clover of our band. Thomas Wentworth Higginson. Five O'Clock with the Immortals the sisters three who spin our fate greet Julia Ward, who comes quite latehing. from Gardiner she writes to Sanborn for the Horatian lines she wishes to quote. ( whenever, she said once to Colonel Higginson, I want to find out about anything difficult, I always write to Sanborn of course! replied Higginson. we all do! Higginson. we all do! at this writing the same course is pursued, there is reason to believe, by many persons in many countries.) it is remembered that in these days when she was leaving Gardiner at the last moment she handed Laura i a note. It read, be sure to rub
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 14: the sundown splendid and serene 1906-1907; aet. 87-88 (search)
in kept from being the over-crowd which I had rather feared. Colonel Higginson came and gave me some lovely verses written for the occasion.sts [of the Authors' Club]; a dais and chair prepared for me, Colonel Higginson standing on my right. Many presentations — Gilder and Clyde had any. My Battle Hymn was sung finely by a male quartette. Colonel Higginson and I were praised almost out of our senses. A calendar, gotrivately told me they were glad of it. January 25.... Read Colonel Higginson's account of me in the Outlook. Wrote him a note of thanks, n sung: Oh! sometimes gleams upon our sight-- Wrote to thank Higginson for sending me word that I am the first woman member of the sociegood thought to express. February 18. To N. E.W. C., where Colonel Higginson and I spoke of Longfellow; I from long and intimate acquainta... I found that my Authors' Club will meet to-day in Cambridge. Higginson telephoned, asking me to speak of Aldrich; I asked permission to
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