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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 18 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 10 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 6 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Richard Hildreth or search for Richard Hildreth in all documents.

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ed Jan. 24, 1891, with an oration by T. W. Higginson, and addresses by Rev. George E. Ellis and Robert C. Winthrop; and the public exercises were followed by a reception at Mr. Winthrop's house. and its succession of presidents, distinguished by the names of Savage, Winthrop, and Ellis, are an assurance of genuine merit in investigation. Theodore Parker, Wendell Phillips, and Henry Wilson, the last an historian as well as Senator and Vice-President, were not admitted to the Society. Richard Hildreth's History of the United States did not bring him membership while he remained in Boston, but after his removal to New York he was made a corresponding member. Sumner was not chosen a member till a few weeks before his death. James Freeman Clarke's membership came late in his life, though his knowledge of history was always wide and accurate. All these were antislavery agitators. The Wednesday Club, its members meeting at one another's houses, which in 1877 completed its first century
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
lose alliance in the causes of freedom and prison reform, where often the brunt of the conflict fell on them. Sumner's visits to his friend at the Institution for the Blind at South Boston were constant. He was one of its trustees. Dr. Howe's rooms were at the time the resort of many who were interested in the moral agitations of the period, Palfrey's diary, Dec. 11, 1846, records his going to Dr. Howe's in the evening to meet John C. Vaughan, of Kentucky, where also were Sumner, Richard Hildreth, C. F. Adams, J. A. Andrew, and John W. Browne. Longfellow wrote in his diary, Nov. 16, 1849: Dined at Howe's. A very pleasant dinner. Palfrey, Adams, Sumner, young Dana, all and several Free Soilers. I, a singer, came into the camp as Alfred among the Danes. and who found there not only ethical inspiration, but also, in the society of both sexes, wit, culture, and the love of art and music. Rt. Rev. F. D. Huntington, now Bishop of Central New York. wrote, in 1886:— Everyth
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 36: first session in Congress.—welcome to Kossuth.—public lands in the West.—the Fugitive Slave Law.—1851-1852. (search)
ad at this time no steady and consistent support among the journals of Boston. The Free Soil organ, the Commonwealth, which was founded early in 1851, had a very uncertain and changeable management. At times Alley, Bird, Dr. Howe, and Joseph Lyman were pecuniarily interested in it, and for some months Samuel E. Sewall was the proprietor. Dr. Howe, Bird, Dr. Palfrey, Robert Carter, 1819-1879. Journalist and scholar, living in Cambridge, but afterwards removing to New York city. and Richard Hildreth the historian were at times contributors or editors; but after a temporary management by one or more of these gentlemen, it usually fell back into the editorial control of Elizur Wright, who was erratic and headstrong, and addicted to so many novelties and hobbies of his own as to exclude any considerate treatment of public questions or effective support of the Free Soil public men. J. D. Baldwin, afterwards of Worcester, succeeded to the management in January, 1853. During 1853 Dr.