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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 2, 1864., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 6, 1864., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
county officers, while still others were either too old or too young for the regular service. Other companies of Georgia infantry were commanded by Capts. A. C. Davenport, John B. Hussey, W. H. Banks, E. R. Whitley, A. Boward, C. S. Jenkins, P. Robinson, S. M. Ralston, D. Crum, D. C. Smith, E. T. Cullens, J. R. Hart, Wm. A. Carswell, G. Lumpkin, J. F. Cooper, W. S. Dubose, J. T. McClusky, N. J. Macarthy, W. S. Goodwin, E. Richards, C. H. Way, W. A. Adams, T. A. Skelton, J. R. Cumming, J. Hill, Jr., W. C. Thornton. During the siege of Atlanta the following commands of Georgia State troops participated: First brigade, Brig.-Gen. R. W. Carswell—First regiment, Col. E. H. Pottle; Second regiment, Col. C. D. Anderson; Fifth regiment, Col. S. S. Stafford; First battalion, Lieut.-Col. H. K. McCoy. Second brigade, Brig.-Gen. P. J. Phillips —Third regiment, Col. Q. M. Hill; Fourth regiment, Col. R. McMillan; Sixth regiment, Col. J. W. Burney; artillery battalion, Col. C. W. Styles. Third
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
sition by LieutenantColo-nel Black and the acting adjutant, Lieut. George W. McLaughlin, of Company A (the Oglethorpes of Augusta), and marched in order to the position assigned it in line of battle. Among the killed was Legare Hill, son of Hon. Joshua Hill, of Madison, Ga. Two of his comrades took up the lifeless body, conveyed it to a little abandoned cottage, pinned his name upon his jacket and left him there. Although this was done in full view of the Federal skirmishers, not a shot was fired at the two men until they had rejoined their comrades. The Federals coming up, took the body of young Hill, buried it, and marked the grave by a headboard on which they cut the name which they found pinned to his jacket. On the 19th a Federal division occupied Rome, capturing a large amount of commissary and quartermaster stores, hospital supplies and ammunition, and the valuable iron works, which were partly destroyed before the town was abandoned by the small Confederate guard; and ear
te bill to regulate impressments and punish lawlessness, together with another Senate bill on the subject of impressments, was postponed till Monday. House joint resolution proposing a joint committee of the two Houses of Congress respecting the exemption of State officers from the military service of the Confederate States was taken up, and, after some remarks in opposition by Mr. Graham, of North Carolina, and Mr. Barnwell, of South Carolina, was laid on the table. On motion, by Mr. Hill, the Senate resolved into secret session. House of Representatives. The House was opened with prayer, by Rev. Dr. Burrows. The House took up and passed a bill, reported from the Committee on the Judiciary, to increase the salaries of all the district judges of the Confederate States to $5,000 per annum, and that where the salary shall now exceed that sum it shall not be diminished. Mr. Russell, from the Judiciary Committee, reported back the bill to compel those persons w
morning we determined to take the road and push on. Going to Mr. Credel's place we found his fine house in ashes and his gin-house burned, and every horse and mule gone. In his lot were about one hundred horses lying dead. They looked like good stock, and were evidently killed to deprive planters of them. A number of Mr. Credel's negroes were gone. Proceed we found every plantation on the devastated, except that no other dwelling houses were burned until we reached the fine farm of Hon. Joshua Hill. This is a perfect wreck. A large gin-house full of cotton corn-cribs, dwelling — all a smouldering ruin. His loss was greater than that of any-planter in this section. Besides the cotton, several thousand bushels of corn, potatoes, several hundred of wheat, and much other valuable property, with every horse and mule and many negroes, are gone. No farm on the road to this place, and, as far as we can hear, towards Atlanta, escaped their brutal ravages. They ravaged the country bel
ox in the country, hence the saving of the corn will be a difficult matter. The enemy were under strict discipline when privates were found on private property they were severed on punished by order of General Sherman. Of course, stragglers committed depredations with impunity. "The right wing of the Federal army, under General Howard, crossed the Okmulgee river between Adams's Ferry and Macon. It is said that the town of Forsyth was completely demolished. "The Federals expressed great astonishment at the rich country they were passing through and the abundance of provisions in it. "The people of Madison are indebted to Hon. Joshua Hill for his strenuous exertions to have their property protected. It was owing to his efforts solely that they were spared. "General Slocum gave orders to the citizens along his route to shoot down his stragglers without mercy. "One punishment inflicted by some of the Federal generals for plundering was severe whipping."
Executors' Sale of eight negroes. --In pursuance of a decree of the Circuit Court of Richmond, we will proceed to sell, on Wednesday, the 14th December, at 10 o'clock, at the auction-house of Hill, Dickinson &Co., 1 young Woman, with three Children; 2 young Women, without encumbrance; 1 Girl and one Boy, about fourteen years of age. S. H. Boykin, F. M. Boykin, Executors of F. M. Boykin, deceased. de 1--2awtds.