hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 18 results in 3 document sections:

The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The career of General A. P. Hill. (search)
he record of battles won, of positions saved, of guns and prisoners captured, gives Hill an emphatic claim to a soldier's fame. His death illustrates the character of his soldiership. Not as some of his equals in rank did his fidelity fall under the certainty of disaster; but manfully and well, in the very hour of defeat, he gave himself a sacrifice to one of the few remaining chances of saving the army. The dead leaders, upon whom the world has lavished honors, leaned upon Hill as strong men upon a staff, and were not disappointed. And it is memorable and remarkable that Lee and Jackson — the magnet and meteor of the Confederacy-should, in their dying moments, have given their last earthly thoughts, their last coherent utterances, to this brave soldier and steadfast patriot. In the paroxysm of death, General Lee called on Hill to move forward; and, when Jackson was crossing the river to seek the shade of the trees, his last words were: Tell A. P. Hill to prepare for action.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
ion on his face; for well he knew that the Master's call had come, and he was ready to answer. He was borne to his chamber, and skilled physicians and loving hands did all that man could do. For nearly a fortnight Twixt night and morn upon the horizon's verge, Between two worlds love hovered like a star. And thus on the morning of October 12th, the star of the mortal sank into the sunrise of immortality, and Robert Lee passed hence to where beyond these voices there is peace. Tell A. P. Hill to prepare for action, were amongst the last words of Stonewall Jackson. Tell Hill he must come up, were the last words of Lee. Their brave Lieutenant, who rests under the green turf of Hollywood, seems to have been latest in the minds of his great commanders, while their spirits yet in martial fancy, roamed again the fields of conflict, and ere they passed to where the soldier dreams of battle-fields no more. The lessons of his life. And did he live in vain, this brave and gentl
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of the statue of General Ambrose Powell Hill at Richmond, Virginia, May 30, 1892. (search)
of the Light Division on whom he had never called in vain: and Tell A. P. Hill to prepare for action fell from his dying lips. And in Geneso often leaned in the hour of peril, and his last command was Tell A. P. Hill he must come up. In personal appearance General Hill was abGeneral Hill was about five feet ten inches high, slightly but perfectly formed, and looked every inch a soldier born to command. His features were regular and itttle Virginia is a granddaughter of Colonel William H. Palmer, General Hill's chief of staff. On the unveiling-stand had gathered the flag- 1863, he was promoted to major-general, and commanded a division in Hill's corps. General Heth in war and in peace has been one of the mosFirst Virginia, who still claim him, and rose to the position of General Hill's assistant adjutant-general and chief of staff. He was every id while here they were introduced to the daughters and neices of General Hill. The Maryland band gave the distinguished Southern ladies a bea