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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. by Brigadier-General James H. Lane. The Gettysburg campaign. [For General Lane's report of Gettysburg, see Vol. V, Southern Historical Society Papers, page 41, and for his account of other details see his letter in the same volume, page 38. And for further mention of the operations of this gallant brigade, see the report of their corps commander, Lieutenant-General A. P. Hill, which was published in our Papers, Vol. II, page 222. We regret that our space will not permit us to reprint these documents, even to preserve the continuity of General Lane's narrative; but we give with pleasure the following letter from the gallant General Trimble, of Maryland, under whose immediate eye these brave North Carolinians fought on the third day at Gettysburg.] Letter from General Trimble. Baltimore, October 15th, 1875. S. D. Pool,--I see by your October number of Our Living and Our Dead, that you defend the reputation of the North Caro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
p camp in the spring, some of the citizens said to me that they had nothing to complain of except the great destruction of timber, which they knew was unavoidable — declared their fences were in better order than they had been for a long time, and expressed the desire, should it be necessary to have troops quartered in their neighborhood again, to have our brigade sent back. Fight at Bristow Station. On our march to this place we guarded the wagon train and a part of the artillery of A. P. Hill's corps. At Bristow we formed line of battle on the left of the road, in an old open field, and were under fire, but were not ordered forward. After the enemy retired we assisted in tearing up and destroying the railroad track to the Rappahanock river, and then went into camp near Brandy Station. Here we remained until after the capture of Hays and Hoke's brigades at the river. We then, with the rest of our corps, formed line of battle near Culpeper Court-house. We were subsequently
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Hatcher's Run-telegram from General Lee. (search)
om General Lee. [Received at Richmond, Va., February 6th, 11 o'clock P. M., 1865, by telegraph from Headquarters A. N. Va.] To General S. Cooper, Adjutant-and Inspector-General: The enemy moved in strong force yesterday to Hatcher's Run. Part of his infantry, with Gregg's cavalry, crossed and proceeded on the Vaughan road — the infantry to Cattail creek, the cavalry to Dinwiddie Court-house, where its advance encountered a portion of our cavalry and retired. In the afternoon parts of Hill's and Gordon's troops demonstrated against the enemy on the left of Hatcher's Run, near Armstrong's mill. Finding him entrenched, they were withdrawn after dark. During the night the force that had advanced beyond the creek returned to it, and were reported to be recrossing. This morning Pegram's division moved down the right bank of the creek to reconnoiter, when it was vigorously attacked. The battle was obstinately contested several hours, but General Pegram being killed while bravely
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia, or the boys in gray, as I saw them from Harper's Ferry in 1861 to Appomattox Court-house in 1865. (search)
rward acting as chaplain in both Stonewall Jackson's and A. P. Hill's corps, I had some peculiar facilities for seeing and kee, J. E. Johnston, Beaureguard, Jackson, Stuart, Ewell, A. P. Hill, Early, Edward Johnson, Rodes, Pender, Heth, Wilcox, Hamputation second to none in the service. Our colonel was A. P. Hill, who had won a fine reputation in the old army, and was nery, &c., could be removed. On the 13th of June, Colonel A. P. Hill, with his own regiment and the Tenth Virginia, movedw we were to become sure enough soldiers. On the 14th, Colonel Hill was started (with his own regiment, the Tenth Virginia,d find no beef for that day's rations. Very well, said Colonel Hill, you can report back to your company. We have no earthe beeves, amid the enthusiastic shouts of the soldiers: Colonel Hill is the Commissary for us. On the night of the 18th of June, Colonel Hill sent two companies of the Thirteenth Virginia and two of the Third Tennessee to surprise the Federal ga
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
Colonel Barbour to deploy his, the Thirty-seventh North Carolina regiment, to the left and parallel to the road to protect our flank. While giving these instructions the rest of the brigade was halted in rear of Scales's by Major Palmer of General A. P. Hill's staff. I was soon after informed by General Hill in person that a part of Scales's brigade had given way, and I was ordered to move forward and re-establish the line, letting my left rest on McGowan's right. After cautioning the SeventhGeneral Hill in person that a part of Scales's brigade had given way, and I was ordered to move forward and re-establish the line, letting my left rest on McGowan's right. After cautioning the Seventh, the left regiment, to be careful not to fire into McGowan, the order for the advance was given, when the brigade, its left being about one hundred yards from the Plank road, moved handsomely forward with their usual battle yell. The advance was necessarily slow, as we had to move through a swamp filled with dense undergrowth and dead fallen trees. The Thirty-eighth North Carolina regiment of Scales's brigade, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Ashford, took position in our line between the Ei
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
sposed to act the gentleman you would give me a civil answer. General Smith at once grasped the hilt of his sword, but the soldier quietly drew his pistol and said: If you don't put up that sword I'll shoot you. The private was arrested, but Colonel Hill interceded for him and General Smith generously consented to his release. I do not know whether it is true, as was currently reported, that one of the engineers proved traitor and caused a collision of two trains, but I know that we had a wrried on to Washington to get the dinner ready. I hope to dine at Willard's, if not to-morrow, certainly before long. Yours to count on, beauty. Stuart was made a Brigadier-General for his gallantry and skill on the outposts, and wrote Colonel Hill, who was then comanding the brigade, a most complimentary letter concerning the conduct of the Thirteenth Virginia regiment. I recollect that a facetious private in one of our companies (poor fellow, he fell at Gaines's Mill in 1862, bravely
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
hich you ought to have sent me. I take the liberty of calling your attention to the part acted by Captain Moore, of the Fourteenth Tennessee, which I think you would have mentioned, had you known, or not forgotten it. When the ordnance train of Hill's division was approaching Catherine Furnace (where the road turns abruptly to the left and down hill) the confusion ahead carried me forward, where I found bullets whistling through the wagons. Passing the crest of the hill and riding up to somey wagons through the fire, if he would stop the artillery and check the enemy's advance. This was done, two guns placed in position, two shots fired and the men driven from the guns by the minnies of the enemy. At this moment Captain Stanard, A. P. Hill's ordnance officer, rode towards me, calling me, and told me that some infantry refused to go in for him, but said that they would accept orders from me. I found Captain Moore, another Captain (whose name I have forgotten, I am sorry to say), a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
ighteenth North Carolina Troops,   1 3 44 Twenty-eighth North Carolina Troops,1  2  123 Thirty-third North Carolina Troops,          Thirty-seventh North Carolina Troops,  12  123 Grand Total11112 321618 Officers killed. Twenty-eighth regiment--Lieutenant E. S. Edwards, Company G. Officers wounded. Thirty-seventh regiment--Lieutenant O. A. Wiggins, Company E. Respectfully, James H. Lane, Brigadier General. Major Joseph A. Engelhard, A. A. G. of Wilcox's Light Division, A. P. Hill's Corps. General Lee acknowledges the receipt of the captured flags.Headquarters A. N. Va., on battle-field, May 13, 1864. Major-General C. M. Wilcox, Commanding Division: General,--General Lee directs me to acknowledge the receipt of the flags captured by Lane's brigade in its gallant charge of yesterday, and to say that they will be forwarded to the Honorable Secretary of War, with the accompanying note, and the names of the brave captors. I am, very respectfull
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battery Gregg-reply to General N. H. Harris. (search)
r side. He could not accept my statement of the case, though present and having control of the whole affair. I have omitted, unintentionally, up to this point, reference to Brigadier-General R. L. Walker's letter. He was Chief of Artillery of Hill's corps. He writes: On the morning of the 3d of April, 1865, I was at Rice's salient until about sun up, when it was reported to me that the lines in front of Fort Gregg had been broken. He was not at Rice's salient on April 3d, 1865. He repairthe General; the italics are his. He may not be aware of the fact, but this was not the first or only time that rocks were used in battle during the war. If he will read the official report of the battle of Second Bull Run, he will see that General A. P. Hill mentions the fact that one of his brigades having exhausted ammunition, used rocks. If I remember correctly, there had been either huts or tents in Gregg, and they had chimneys made of brick or stone, or of both of these kinds of material.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
which the men were allowed to choose their own officers would have demoralized almost any other troops in the world; but the splendid morale of our army, their high intelligence, and their devotion to the cause, brought us safely through this severest ordeal without serious damage. There were, of course, some good officers who were thrown out, and some indifferent ones elected; but on the whole the army was about as well officered as before. In my own regiment the Colonel (J. A. Walker — A. P. Hill had been recently promoted), stated in my presence soon after the election, that if he had had the appointment of company officers, he would have appointed just the ones whom the men had elected. Stonewall Jackson had been sent to the command of the Valley District, in October, 1861, and had displayed that wonderful activity which seasoned his men and prepared them for what was to follow. His mid-winter march to Bath, Hancock and Romney; his indignant resignation because he thought the
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