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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
Brave defence of the Cockade City. Fight at Rives' Farm, in Prince Edward County, with the sufferings in the Northern prison of those who fell into the hands of the enemy. address by John F. Ulenn. Mr. John F. Glenn delivered the following address before R. E. Lee Camp, Confederate Veterans, on the 9th of June, 1906, and subsequently before A. P. Hill Camp, Petersburg, Va., on the defence of Petersburg in 1864, and is full of interest. It is now printed from a revised copy furnished by the author. In essaying to give an account of some personal recollections of the affair of the 9th of June, 1864, between the small force of militia and second-class reserves, under Colonel Fletcher H. Arthur, and an overwhelming force of cavalry and artillery under the Federal General August V. Kautz, at the Rives Farm, in Prince George county, and some reminiscences of prison life, it is foreign to my purpose to give anything more than a skeleton outline of conditions existing and leading up
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences. (search)
rbities engendered by it are fast being buried in the grave of Oblivion — where is the gray-headed Confederate whose eve does not kindle at the remembrance of those four heroic years? Does he not feel like re-echoing the glowing words which the great dramatist puts in the mouth of Henry the Fifth the night before Agincourt, This story shall the goodman teach his son.— The that shall live this day, and see old age, Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbors, And say, To-morrow is Saint Crispin; Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars, And say, These wounds I had on Crispin's day. And does not his heart burn while he tells with pride of the days when with unfaltering steps, though weary and hungry, but with the light of battle in his eye, he followed in the lead of those illustrious captains and masters of war, A. P. Hill, Jackson, Hampton, Stuart, Mosby, Johnston, Kirby Smith and a host of other gallant spirits—and last, though not least, of Robert Edward
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of General Jackson (search)
umn, and it was only on the afternoon of June 26th, when we heard A. P. Hill's guns at Mechanicsville, that we fully realized where we were goy captured. At one time he put every commander of a battery in A. P. Hill's Light Division under arrest for some slight disobedience of orders. He put A. P. Hill under arrest several times, and there were charges and countercharges between these accomplished soldiers, until Genat General Lee thought that he was too severe both on Garnett and A. P. Hill. But there can be little doubt that if there had been more sternving up in General Ewell's rear between him and the moving column of Hill's Division. I waited to satisfy myself that they were real Blue Coa course, important business elsewhere, and was galloping to find General Hill, who commanded that part of our column, when I ran up against ole now moving up in the rear of General Ewell, and between him and A. P. Hill's column? No! have they? Yes, sir, I have seen them. Are
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Remarkable record of the Haskells of South Carolina. (search)
t, but genial, hiding what suspense and anguish held her, making, unknowingly, great history for her State and for all time. The eldest son was Langdon Cheves Haskell, who served on the staff of General Maxey Gregg, later on the staff of General A. P. Hill, and surrendered at Appomattox as captain on the staff of Fighting Dick Anderson, of his own State. He married Miss Ella Wardlaw, of Abbeville, dying in 1886, and leaving three sons and one daughter, all adults. Charles Thompson Haskell to attack Charleston in July, 1863. He, happily, left no widow. The next was William Thompson Haskell. He was captain of Company H, First South Carolina volunteers, and died at the charge of that corps at Gettysburg while commanding under A. P. Hill. Alexander Cheves Haskell lived through the day of Appomattox. He was colonel of the Seventh South Carolina Cavalry, of ruddy record, and still lives at Columbia. His first marriage was one of the most touching romances of the war. Miss R
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Hood's Brigade. (search)
n the north bank of the Chickahominy under Jackson and that on the south bank under Lee, were reunited. On the morning of the 27th of June, to-day thirty-nine years ago, at early dawn, the Confederates began seeking the enemy; Longstreet and A. P. Hill pursued the routes on our right nearest the Chickahominy, and came soonest on their lines, while the troops under Jackson, composed of the divisions of Whiting, Ewell and D. H. Hill, having to make a detour further to our left, came later upon and later on the left, and conformed to the enemy's in shape, but our position, aside from their fortifications, was far inferior to theirs. Our line of battle, as formed, extending from right to left, was as follows: Longstreet on the right, A. P. Hill to his left, then the divisions of Ewell and D. H. Hill to his left in the order stated. Whiting's Division, composed of Hood's and Law's Brigades, did not form in line, but were held in reserve near Cold Harbor. The battle began in earnest a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Warren Blues—Extra Billy's men: Roll of officers and men of a famous band of Veterans. (search)
erly sergeant, wounded and captured at Fort Steadman. Catterton, Elijah N., captured at Fort Steadman (dead). Chapman, N. T. (Bose). Carr, James, captured on retreat. Coles, Thomas S., sick and died in a Petersburg hospital. Earley, Jerry A. Elliott, M. D., captured at Fort Steadman (living). Fry, J. N. Harris, James O., sergeant, surrendered at Appomattox (dead). Harris, Henry, captured at Fort Steadman. Hurt, Morris, captured on retreat to Appomattox (dead). Hill, Joseph, captured (dead). Jarman, J. L. (living). Kirby, J. S., wounded at Hatcher's Run. Kirby, Edward, captured. Maupin, Gabriel, captured. Mayo, William P., captured. Moore, Shepherd, captured. Maddox, James, captured. Michie, Lucien A., captured at Fort Steadman. Mayo, J. R., wounded at Hatcher's Run. Munday, Castello, captured. Owens, Crede, captured. Powell, William, captured at Fort Steadman. Shelton, Austin. Shackleford, John. Snead, N. S.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of Company E, Nineteenth Virginia Infantry. (search)
ber 19, 1864. Gregory, Benjamin F., enlisted March 15, 1862. Goss, John W., transferred Company K, 2nd Regiment, Virginia Cavalry, and from there to 39th Battalion, Virginia Cavalry. Gore, James, discharged 1862, by conscript act, over thirty-five years of age. Goss, Ebenezer, enlisted October 10, 1864; exchanged with H. T. McCune to 39th Battalion, Virginia Cavalry, November 23, 1864. Harlow, Samuel M. Herring, Henry A., detailed brigade teamster. Herring, John Henry. Hill, William H., wounded in hand, Second Manassas, August 30, 1862. Hall, Henry J., killed in battle at Gettysburg, July 3, 1863. Hall, William S., wounded in right shoulder, Gaines' Mill, June 27, 1862. Hall, Joseph M., enlisted March 28, 1862. Hall, E. B., honorably discharged and detailed to other service. Harris, William, honorably discharged and detailed to other service. Harlow, Lucian M., enlisted May 10, 1861. Johnson, W. W., died Chimborazo Hospital, typhoid fever, J
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.64 (search)
ey, George, Cooper, J., Clarey, L., Md.; Clarey, Thad., Md.; Clarey, Rich., Md.; Chisholm, Wallace, Md.; Cresap, Van, Md.; Cosner, Wayne, Carle, George, Coffman, Joseph, Childs, Ben, Cunningham, John, Daugherty, Sam, Davis, R. C., Duffy, J. W., Duval, H: R., Md.; Davis, Frank, Dyer, Robin, Dyce, Sam, Devectman, P., Md.; Enright, E. C., Fay, J. B. Md.; Fisher, J. G., Frederick, Lewis, Gray, S., Grady, George, Harness, G. S., Halterman, J., Harvey, J., Hevener, J., Hoy, William, Harness, W. W., Hill, I., Houck, William, Houseworth, J., Hess, James, Hunter, John, Hutter, C. R., High, J. W., Hoad, H., Hack, A. C., Md.; Hutton, John, Hopkins, William, Harper, John, Judy, D., Jones, H. C., Johnson, Charles, Jacobs, George, Jones, Sam, Johnson, Fisher, Johnson, John, Kiracoffe, Nelson, Ketterman, H., Lobb, Robert, Lynn, John, Md.; Lynn, Sprigg, Md.; Long, J. R., Larey, M., Luke, William, Md.; Logan, Loyd, Liggett, Robert, Mason, J. H., Markwood, John, Martin, Taylor, Maloney, William, Marginn
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.70 (search)
rity of that army gone, the life of the Southern Confederacy was flickering and low, and soon extinguished. Hatcher's Run, the 31st of March, 1865, found Pickett's Division on the march, detached from General Lee's Army, and co-operating with General Fitz Lee's Division of Cavalry. The brigade of William R. Terry, of Bedford—Buck Terry, as we called him—was composed of the 1st, 3rd, 7th, 11th and 24th Regiments of Virginia Infantry. Amongst its previous commanders were James L. Kemper, A. P. Hill and James Longstreet. That morning it was leading the division, and the 24th Infantry (Major Bentley commanding) was leading the brigade. It was a beautiful morning. Everybody was in fine spirits. The esprit du corps, so characteristic of Pickett's Division, marked it as a body of men of which any commander might be proud. Enemy in front, holding ford over Hatcher's Run, came from one of our scouts. The division was at once halted, and General Pickett rode up to me (my regiment was n