hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 310 68 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 306 36 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 305 15 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 289 5 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 262 18 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 233 13 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 204 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 182 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 170 8 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 146 14 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson. You can also browse the collection for D. H. Hill or search for D. H. Hill in all documents.

Your search returned 64 results in 6 document sections:

Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 8: winter campaign in the Valley. 1861-62. (search)
r repairing the inequality of his force. But he constructed no works for the defence of Winchester. To an inquiry of General Hill, he replied, I am not fortifying; my position can be turned on all sides. Knowing that, if he enclosed himself in fore him the aid he desired, looked next for co-operation to the force stationed at Leesburg, in Loudoun county, under General D. H. Hill. By providing means of rapid transit across the Shenandoah at Castleman's Ferry, and establishing a telegraph lined Winchester, he proposed to secure a concentration of the two forces by two days march at most. He also advised that General Hill should proceed to the Loudoun heights, in the northwest corner of that county, and station some artillery upon the moule, as to compel General Banks to relinquish that line of approach. But the duty of guarding his own position forbade General Hill to extend to him the proposed assistance. He therefore busied himself in removing his sick, and his army stores to Mo
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 14: the Richmond campaign. (search)
eral Hill, supported by Ripley's brigade, of D. H. Hill's division, speedily carried the little villconfidence; for the time thus allowed to General D. H. Hill enabled him to reach the desired point osed position of the enemy, with the division of Hill in front, followed by those of Ewell, Whiting, . P. Hill from the Confederate right, and of D. H. Hill and Jackson from the left, moved into the cor left, in order to confront the enemy. General D. H. Hill, on the Confederate left, moved first, a found himself behind the struggling line of D. H. Hill. This indomitable soldier was just devisingarching to the attack. To obviate this danger, Hill determined to storm the battery with five regimry. Upon his wing a few of the batteries of D. H. Hill were put in action at the extreme left, withis column, composed again of the division of D. H. Hill, reached the scene of the evening's combat, h. Five o'clock had now arrived, when suddenly Hill heard a mighty shout upon his right, followed b[15 more...]
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 16: second Manassa's. (search)
aggression, and that the surest way to remove him finally from the peninsula would be to threaten Washington more violently, began to remove the remainder of his army from Richmond to the Rapid Ann, August 13th; proposing to leave only a small force for observation upon his lines there, until the success of his experiment was verified. On that day, General Longstreet commenced his march for Gordonsville, and the remainder of the troops were moved in the same direction, the division of General D. H. Hill bringing up the rear, near the end of the month. Halleck, the new Federal generalissimo, was also eagerly dictating the same movement to McClellan. He found the Grand army divided into two widely separated fragments, and trembled before the activity of Jackson, and the danger of his Capital. McClellan accordingly broke up his camps at Berkeley on the 17th of August, and with sore reluctance shipped the decimated remains of his troops to Aquia Creek on the Potomac. Disease had: been
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 17: the campaign in Maryland. (search)
two veteran divisions of R. H. Anderson and D. H. Hill had now overtaken the main army, diminished cavalry of Stuart and the fresh division of D. H. Hill in front, followed by the corps of Jackson, th of September, by placing the divisions of D. H. Hill, Longstreet and Hood upon the range of hillss stream, and had Longstreet upon the right and Hill upon the left of the road which led to Boonsboron now occupied the whole left, from that of D. H. Hill forth, and the command of Hood became the retween the Hagerstown road and the command of D. H. Hill. On the left of these, and parallel to thated its fury upon Jackson, than it burst upon D. H. Hill and Longstreet, with almost equal violence; pouring through a breach in the single line of Hill, and about to seize the very key of the Confedeicate the remaining divisions of Longstreet, D. H. Hill, and Jones. These crossed the Antietam to Sas now the successor of Lawton,) and that of D. H. Hill, (which had the day before been permanently.[6 more...]
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 18: Fredericksburg. (search)
Major-General A. P. Hill; and that of Major-General D. H. Hill. To these were attached numerous batlies for the sustenance of the army. General D. H. Hill proceeded to Port Royal on the 3rd of Deters the Rappahannock. The attention of General D. H. Hill was somehow called to it, as offering anngstreet. At Port Royal was the division of D. H. Hill; between him and Longstreet, was the divisioer behind Gregg and Archer. The division of D. H. Hill was held as a reserve in the third line. Alhin the woods, and the fragments of the line of Hill and of his enemies were mixed in inextricable ce position of General Hood. The division of D. H. Hill, whose services had not been needed to compl the same lines, except that the division of D. H. Hill was placed in the front, and that of Early wsm which reigned among them, the division of D. H. Hill, which should, in turn, have been relieved f of December, while as yet neither Early nor D. H. Hill were in position, he might have carried, by [4 more...]
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 19: Chancellorsville. (search)
forage and food in Spottsylvania. The corps of General Jackson now consisted of four divisions,--those of A. P. Hill; D. H. Hill, commanded by Brigadier General Rhodes; Trimble, commanded by Brigadier General Colston; and Early.--General D. H. HillGeneral D. H. Hill had been detached to another and more important command, and Major-General Trimble was detained by infirmity at his home. The four divisions now contained about twenty-eight thousand muskets, and an aggregate of more than thirty thousand men and ofe movement was begun at the appointed time by the light of a brilliant moon. The column was led by the division of General D. H. Hill, under Brigadier-General Rhodes. Before the mists of the morning had cleared away, the whole corps was far on its l of the struggle; or all that had been won would be lost. Brigadier General Rhodes, commanding the former division of D. H. Hill, was found to be the senior officer upon the field; and his modesty, with the lack of acquaintanceship between him and