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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 310 68 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 306 36 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 305 15 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 289 5 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 262 18 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 233 13 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 204 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 182 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 170 8 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 146 14 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for D. H. Hill or search for D. H. Hill in all documents.

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emy, at Bethel Church, nine miles from Hampton. The enemy made three distinct and well-sustained charges, but were repulsed with heavy loss. Our cavalry pursued them for six miles, when their retreat became a total rout. Fearing that heavy reinforcements would be sent up from Fortress Monroe, we fell back at nightfall upon our works at Yorktown. I regret to report the loss of one man killed--private Henry L. Wyatt, Edgecomb Guards--and seven wounded. The loss of the enemy, by their own confession, was one hundred and fifty, but it may be safely estimated at two hundred and fifty. Our regiment behaved most gallantly. Not a man shrunk from his post or showed symptoms of fear. When more at leisure I will give you a detailed report of the operations. Our Heavenly Father has most wonderfully interposed to shield our hearts in the day of battle. Unto His great name be all the praise for our success. With much respect, D. H. Hill, Col. First Regiment N. C. Volunteers.