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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 310 68 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 306 36 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 305 15 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 289 5 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 262 18 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 233 13 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 204 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 182 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 170 8 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 146 14 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for D. H. Hill or search for D. H. Hill in all documents.

Your search returned 18 results in 4 document sections:

Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 19. the siege of Suffolk, Virginia. (search)
he advance of Pettigrew towards Newbern, and of Hill upon Little Washington, were only feints (our ckindly telegraphed that he had advices that General Hill would join Longstreet. The time when the N men, upon Suffolk. On the fifteenth of April, Hill discontinued his feints upon Little Washington,d with him such able West Pointers as Lieutenant-Generals Hill, Hood and Anderson, and Major-Generalions made early in April, in North Carolina, by Hill and Pettigrew, Wise made a bold one on Williamst Lee they were each eight thousand strong. D. H. Hill is ordered from Washington to reinforce Longrders. Not less than twelve thousand came under Hill, French, and others. General Foster's estimate Among the division commanders were Lieutenant-Generals Hill and Hood, French, Picket, &c. Major-G. In my possession is a communication from General Hill to Lieutenant-General Longstreet, commandinin his annual report, says, viz.: The rebel General Hill marched towards the Nansemond to reinforce [3 more...]
been promised sixty thousand men for his spring work, and was ready about the last of March to open the campaign for the recovery of Southern Virginia. He ordered Hill and Pettigrew to make a series of demonstrations at Newbern, Little Washington, and other points in North Carolina, with the design of causing troops to be sent frer and success of his feints, crossed the Blackwater, and on the same day advanced, with about twenty-eight thousand men, upon Suffolk. On the fifteenth of April, Hill discontinued his feints upon Little Washington, and sent those troops to Suffolk. He followed soon after with the remainder of his command. The rebel force in er the concentration, more than fifty thousand men. Probably forty thousand is a safe estimate; and he had associated with him such able West Pointers as Lieutenant-Generals Hill, Hood and Anderson, and Major-Generals Picket, French and Garnett, &c. The Petersburg Express of the fifteenth of April reflected the Confederate expecta
Commander-in-chief's report. The commanding General visited Suffolk during the investment, and in his annual report, says, viz.: The rebel General Hill marched towards the Nansemond to reinforce Longstreet, who was investing Suffolk. Failing in his direct assault upon this place, the enemy proceeded to establish batteries for its reduction. General Peck made every preparation for defence of which — the place was capable, and retarded the construction of his works, till finally the attempt was abandone
, and the heavy demands of the fight had nearly exhausted the supply for the rest of their army. This, with the disappointment of the rebel soldiers at the failure of their enterprise to invade Pennsylvania, were advantages which should not have been thrown away. Another opportunity for success was offered when the army was at Warrenton, in the fall of 1862. The rebel force was then divided. Longstreet, and A. P. Hill, with their corps, being at Culpepper, while Stonewall Jackson and D. H. Hill were in the Shenandoah valley, at Front Royal. By crushing Longstreet at Culpepper, the army would cripple that of the rebels, and would cut it off from Richmond. Culpepper should have been occupied. It was at this time that General Burnside assumed command of the army, and unfortunately decided to march on Fredericksburg. the Fredericksburg campaign. The details of that campaign have already been so thoroughly examined by your honorable committee, as to leave nothing to be sai