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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 310 68 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 306 36 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 305 15 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 289 5 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 262 18 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 233 13 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 204 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 182 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 170 8 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 146 14 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for D. H. Hill or search for D. H. Hill in all documents.

Your search returned 18 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
. The execution of this design is best described by General D. H. Hill in his official report: Instead of ordering up one of Chattanooga effective it was absolutely necessary for General Hill's corps to be passed through Dug Gap in Pigeon Mountaindispatches were regularly forwarded by me to you and General D. H. Hill, then with his corps at Lafayette, where I had my owight I received an order to report to you in person, at General Hill's quarters. On my arrival I found a Major of engineerst carry out those he had received. I then learned from General Hill and yourself, that he had erred in supposing that the eette, and just at the eastern base of Lookout Mountain. General Hill had mistaken the purport of the information received, wpon the enemy and cut off his retreat to Well's Valley, and Hill, moving through Dug Gap, to second Hindman's attack, when ite to confront any force McCook might advance from Alpine. Hill's troops moved promptly into the Gap at a very early hour.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate Artillery service. (search)
een the results accomplished by the artillery forces of the two armies is very striking in these two instances, and is even more so in the battle of Malvern Hill, which, it is well known, was decided by the powerful artillery concentrated by the enemy. General Lee had designed that a very heavy artillery fire should precede the infantry attack, and ample time (from 10 A. M. to 5 P. M.) had been allowed for all dispositions to be made. The execution of this design is best described by General D. H. Hill in his official report: Instead of ordering up one or two hundred pieces of artillery to play on the Yankees, a single battery (Moorman's) was ordered up and knocked to pieces in a few moments. One or two others shared the same fate of being beaten in detail. Not knowing how to act under these circumstances, I wrote to General Jackson that the firing from our batteries was of the most farcical character. The serious defects of the artillery organization were, however, not entirely
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A defence of General Bragg's conduct at Chickamauga. (search)
rection of Chattanooga effective it was absolutely necessary for General Hill's corps to be passed through Dug Gap in Pigeon Mountain to cut ouplicate dispatches were regularly forwarded by me to you and General D. H. Hill, then with his corps at Lafayette, where I had my own headquack that night I received an order to report to you in person, at General Hill's quarters. On my arrival I found a Major of engineers—in brokend he must carry out those he had received. I then learned from General Hill and yourself, that he had erred in supposing that the enemy had of Lafayette, and just at the eastern base of Lookout Mountain. General Hill had mistaken the purport of the information received, which you to move upon the enemy and cut off his retreat to Well's Valley, and Hill, moving through Dug Gap, to second Hindman's attack, when it had bect Lafayette to confront any force McCook might advance from Alpine. Hill's troops moved promptly into the Gap at a very early hour. Having s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate Artillery at Second Manassas and Sharpsburg. (search)
); Hupp's (Salem Artillery); Macon's (Richmond Fayette Artillery); Watson's (Second Richmond Howitzers); Smith's (Third Richmond Howitzers); Coke's—(6?). Nelson's Battalion, Major William Nelson.—Ancell's Battery; Huckstep's; Kirkpatrick's; Milledge's—(4). Cults's Battalion, Lieutenant-Colonel Cutts.—Blackshear's Battery; Rose's; Lane's; Patterson's—(4). With D. H Hill. Jones's Battalion, Major H. P. Jones.—Wimbush's Battery; Turner's; Peyton's (Fry's); R. C. M. Page's—(4). D. H. Hill had also Carter's (King William Artillery); Bondurant's (Jeff. Davis Artillery), and Hardaway's Battery—(3). With McLaws's Division.—Read's Battery; Carleton's; Lloyd's (?); Manly's—(4). Moody's Battery (1), was attached to Colonel S. D. Lee's command. There were also with the army in September, G. W. Nelson's Battery (Hanover Artillery); T. J. Page's; Marmaduke Johnson's; Woolfolk's; Dearborn's—(5)—the assignment of which I do not know. This gi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Lee Memorial Association. (search)
of the meeting communicate copies of these and our former resolutions to Mrs. Lee. Thus was originated the movement which has so happily resulted in suitably decorating the grave of Lee. The Lee Memorial Association was formally organized October 24th, 1870, with the following officers: President—General John C. Breckinridge, of Kentucky. Vice-Presidents—General J. E. Johnston, General J. A. Early, and Colonel W. H. Taylor, of Virginia; General G. T. Beauregard, Louisiana; General D. H. Hill, North Carolina; General Wade Hampton, South Carolina; General J. B. Gordon, Georgia; General W. J. Hardee, Alabama; General S. D. Lee, Mississippi; General R. S. Ewell, Tennessee; General J. B. Hood, Texas; General I. R. Trimble, Maryland; General J. S. Marmaduke, Missouri; General William Preston, Kentucky; General Tappan, Arkansas. Treasurer—C. M. Figgatt, Bank of Lexington. Secretary—Colonel C. A. Davidson, of Lexington, Virginia. The Association was incorporated by act of