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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for L. W. Hill or search for L. W. Hill in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 37: operations of the East Gulf Squadron to October, 1863. (search)
Morris. Steamer Magnolia. Acting-Master, Chas. Potter; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, E. D. G. Smith; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, W. J. Coite; Acting-Masters, Francis Burgess and Alex. Wallace; Acting-Master's Mates, David Scyler, Peter McGuire and O. Sundstrom; Engineers, Edward Eldridge, E. D. Leavitt, Jr., and R. H. Shultis. Steamer Stars and Stripes. Acting-Master, C. L. Willcombe; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, Benj. Marshall; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. J. Pratt; Acting-Masters, L. W. Hill, Geo. Ashbury, Thomas Smith and G. H. Cole; Acting-Master's Mates, H. B. Conklin, C. P. Turner and Alex. Cushman; Engineers, John Briggs, T. D. Coffee, John Burns and H. F. Brown. Bark James L. Davis. Acting-Master, John West; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, E. B. Jackson; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, B. S. Price; Acting-Masters, Alex. Waugh and Geo. F. Hammond; Acting-Master's Mates, A. J. Lyon, S. E. Willetts and G. H. Disley. Bark Roebuck. Acting-Master, John Sherrill; Acting-Assis
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 39: Miscellaneous operations, land and sea.--operations in the Nansemond, Cape Fear, Pamunky, Chucka Tuck and James Rivers.--destruction of blockade-runners.--adventures of Lieutenant Cushing, etc. (search)
made, which was to bring the civil war to a termination. The available strength of the Federal army on the Potomac, including the Ninth Corps and the reinforcements that were held in Washington, was not less than 170,000 men. The force which the Confederates had to oppose was much inferior, according to their own account. The Confederate Army of the Rapidan, at the beginning of the campaign of 1864, consisted of two divisions of Longstreet's corps with 8,000 men, Ewell's corps of 14,000, Hill's corps of 13,000, three divisions of cavalry, and the artillery. So that, according to Confederate historians, Lee's effective force of infantry did not exceed 40,000 men. The cavalry divisions did not each exceed the proper strength of a brigade, and the artillery was in proportion to the other arms, altogether not over 80,000 men of all arms. But it will not do to rely upon Confederate figures, and General Grant's estimate placed Lee's force at 120,000 men, including the militia and loca