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rong and able speech in favor of compromise, in the course of which he said he would almost pray for a foreign war, that it might bind us again as one, and prevent the shedding of fraternal blood. He would give up every thing but honor. B. R. Curtis, Esq., ex-judge of the United-States Supreme Court, made the leading speech, which was received with great favor. The resolutions were read by Colonel Jonas French. Speeches were made by Mr. Wightman, mayor of the city, Mr. Saltonstall, Mr. G. S. Hillard, and others, some of whom afterwards distinguished themselves as officers in the war. This meeting spoke the sentiments of the conservative citizens, who regarded war and disunion as evils greater than the existence of slavery, or even of its further extension; and yet they were anti-slavery men, and regarded slavery as a great moral and political wrong, and would gladly have seen it abolished. A few days later, on the 11th of February, a great meeting was held in Cambridge. The
eeting in Statestreet Mr. Webster's speech meeting in the Music Hall speech ofWendell Phillips meeting in Chester Park speeches of Edward Everettand Benjamin F. Hallett meeting under the Washington Elm in Cambridge Ex-Governor Banks, George S. Hillard, and others letters received bythe Governor extracts reception of the dead bodies of the killed inBaltimore Mr. Crowninshield goes abroad to buy arms Ex-Governorboutwell sent to Washington letter of John M. Forbes to Mr. Felton letted dawn of the Revolution which created our nation, drew his sacred sword on this memorable spot, we desire to consecrate ourselves to the services of freedom and our country. The meeting was addressed by John C. Park, ex-Governor Banks, George S. Hillard, and Thomas H. Russell in speeches filled with patriotic sentiments and earnest appeals to the judgment and conscience of the people. We now return to the State House, where the work of fitting out regiments, organizing new departments,