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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 6 0 Browse Search
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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
Great was the rejoicing over this reunion, which was signalized by a formal reception. In the evening there was a collation given by the colored people. Garrison, wrote Wendell Phillips to Elizabeth Pease (Ms. Aug. 26, 1841), was in fine vein-witty and fluent; his wife's eyes worth a queen's dowry. Miss Southwick and I were tied to a Haytian to speak bad French to him, as he could talk only [to] two beside ourselves. Bradburn and W. L. G. brightened each other by their retorts. Said Himes, alluding modestly to his wish to be always acting, though only effecting a little, I am but a cipher, but I keep always on the slate. Yes, said W. L. G., and always on the right side. [S. J.] May, whose extra care to be candid led some new-organized ones to fancy he was going to join them, took occasion to explain his position. Said he: One asked me the other day if I was going to Chardon-St. Chapel [i. e., to the reception to Phillips and Collins]. —Yes.—Why, Mr. May, I heard you wer
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 3: the covenant with death.1843. (search)
h slave States, but drew the line at Texas, did not find an enthusiastic response to their disunion Lib. 13.191. menace in the Liberty Party. As usual, Mr. Garrison's mind had been occupied with many subjects besides that which claimed his chief attention. Great was the popular fermentation over Millerism, Mss. Mar. 31, 1843, M. W. Chapman to H. C. Wright; June 27, E. Quincy to R. D. Webb; Lib. 13: 23, 27. which drew off many abolitionists from the ranks, including Charles Fitch and J. V. Himes, and was controverted by the editor of the Liberator in two elaborate articles. Communism and socialism also diverted many. In June, Mr. Garrison attended as a spectator two meetings, in the Chardon-Street Chapel, for the discussion of the questions pertaining to the reorganization of society and the rights of property, Lib. 13.91. in which Collins took a leading part. He heard nothing which attracted him to the doctrines advocated. On Dec. 16, 1843, Mr. Garrison wrote to H. C. Wrig
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
tion of our brethren in bonds in every part of the world. This proved very obnoxious, especially to the American delegates, the Rev. E. N. Kirk saying, with perfect truth, that it would hazard the very existence of the Alliance. It was accordingly withdrawn; but the next day the Rev. J. Howard Hinton, editor of the Anti-Slavery Reporter, moved the exclusion of slaveholders from the Alliance, and one voice from across the water was heard to second it, that of J. V. Lib. 16:[154], 185, 190. Himes, whose sympathizers in the American delegation numbered less than half a dozen. Great was the Lib. 16.165. excitement produced in this delegation, with all their efforts to be calm. During the recess, the discussion went on Lib. 16:[154]. informally, but with added earnestness. One overheard an American patriarch (Beecher), whose eyes are moist with tears Lyman Beecher.—but not for the slave—saying: Brethren, you are too warm. Remember the work you have to do, and be wise. Worldly-wis