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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 2 2 Browse Search
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n the habit of using ice, and now called to a warm climate, where it is more a necessity than a luxury, we shall be happy to contribute a cargo for their use, the time to be at your disposal, whenever you deem it expedient to send it. In case there is no suitable place to receive the cargo, it can be packed in the vessel, and kept for months, with proper care. The offer was accepted, and a vessel was chartered to take the ice to Fortress Monroe. The occupants of Quincy Market, of whom Hiscock & Winslow and Harrison Bird were a committee, contributed a large quantity of fresh provisions, which were preserved on the ice, and sent in the ship. On the 1st of May, the bodies of Luther C. Ladd, Addison O. Whitney, and Sumner H. Needham, who were killed in Baltimore on the 19th of April, reached Boston. Even then the names of the dead were not positively known. The bodies were properly received, and placed in the receiving-vault at King's Chapel. That same afternoon, the Governor
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 54: public addresses concerning the freedmen in 1866, advocating education (search)
rength, saved a Republic, broke the chains of four millions of slaves, and inaugurated genuine, universal, unqualified liberty.Extracts from address delivered at Springfield, Mass., February 19, 1866. On February 21st, at a meeting in the interest of my work held at the Cooper Institute, New York, the venerable Dr. Ferris, president of the New York University, Horace Greeley, and many other men of social and political prominence were present. The meeting was opened with prayer by the Rev. Dr. Hiscock, and then I was introduced to the large audience. After brief comparisons and contrasts drawn between Russian serfdom and American slavery, I went on to discuss the attitude of the Southern white people toward negroes now free. There was, I claimed, on their part a positive aversion to giving freedom and rights of citizenship to the negro. A large proportion of the former slaveholders looked upon the reasonings of Northern men as vagaries and did not hesitate to express the convict
6, 244, 262, 264, 311, 312, 390. Herbert, B. H., II, 586. Hertz, Sue E., II, 575. Hess, Frederick, I, 517. Heth, Henry, I, 400, 406, 408. Higgins, Frank W., II, 574. Hill, A. P., I, 263, 304, 305, 332, 334, 335, 380, 385, 388, 400, 403, 404, 407, 421, 429, 580, 581. Hill, D. H., I, 141, 231, 232, 235, 275, 279-281, 284, 287, 290, 293, 294, 297, 299, 332. Hill, Ellas, II, 387. Hillhouse, John, 1, 67. Hillhouse, Mrs. John, I, 67. Hipp, Charles, I1, 22, 23. Hiscock, Rev., 11, 316. Hitchcock, Henry, II, 159. Hitchcock, Roswell G., I, 128. Hodder, Mr., II, 543. Hoffman, Ernest F., I, 365, 376, 491. Holabird, S. B., I, 101. Holmes, Freeland S., I, 37. Holmes, William 1R., I, 151. Hood, J. B., I, 240, 287, 290, 294, 332, 426, 510, 518, 520, 528, 529, 532-534, 539, 542, 543, 546, 549, 572, 575, 578, 598, 604, 605, 607, 609, 612; II, 7, 11, 14, 16-18, 21, 26, 28, 29, 34, 41, 47, 48, 50, 52, 55, 57, 63-66, 69, 93, 151. Hooker, Joseph, 1