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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 22 2 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 2 2 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1 1 Browse Search
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ops First to land care of the sick and wounded Dr.Hitchcock sent on the wounded in New York Colonel Frank . He at once selected, with great judgment, Hon. Alfred Hitchcock, of Fitchburg, a member of the Executive Coueam transport, by order of General Burnside; and Dr. Hitchcock was placed in charge of them, with full power to the loyal papers of that day, and in letters of Dr. Hitchcock and Colonel Frank E. Howe to Governor Andrew. from New York, March 11, Received telegram from Dr. Hitchcock at two o'clock at night, got up immediately, did all I could for him and his poor men. Dr. Hitchcock is a remarkable man. It was very rough for him and all hisday. Also telegraphs the Governor the same day, Dr. Hitchcock leaves with his men in halfpast-three-o'clock trommending to their courtesy and co-operation Dr. Alfred Hitchcock and his assistant, Mr. J. W. Wellman, who weitals, and transporting them to their homes. Of Dr. Hitchcock's services, while thus detailed, we have already
draft Militiavolunteers letter to the President great activity in recruiting liberality of John M. Forbes Colonel Maggi town authorities ask Civiliansto be commissioned First attempt to raise colored troops Letterto Hon. J. G. Abbott recommends Merchants and others to devote Halfof each day to recruiting hardship to Seaboard towns attempt to haveCredits allowed for men in the Navy difficulties earnest letter surgeons sent forward several recommendations battle of Antietam Dr.Hitchcock sent forward his report affairs at the front Recruitingbrisk Republican Convention sharp debate nominations People'sconvention General Devens nominated for Governor speeches Letterto General Dix contrabands complaints quotas filled departure ofRegiments invasion of Texas Major Burt State appointments, &c. On the fourth day of July, 1862, the President of the United States issued a call for three hundred thousand men, to serve for three years or to the end of the war. T
pril 20, 1861. On the 19th of April, the Governor wrote by his military secretary, Colonel Browne, to William E. Parmenter, of West Cambridge,— I send you copies of correspondence concerning an application of Colonel Joselyn, of our Fifteenth Regiment, precisely similar to that in the case in which you are interested. You will see that it is about hopeless to induce the Secretary of War to let any rebel go from the North to the South, to arrange an exchange for himself. But General Hitchcock seems to think there would be no objection to the reverse of the arrangement, and is willing to arrange, with any of our men whom the rebels will send North, for the return of rebels, and exchange for them. I will stir up the case again, nevertheless. In April, two enlisted men were tried by court-martial for military offences, and sentenced to be shot. On the 21st of April, the Governor wrote to Major Cabot, commanding Fort Warren, where the condemned men were confined,— A
ion, that, although no longer available for soup, they would nevertheless promote the advancement of science. In the battle before Petersburg, July 30, among the prisoners taken was Brigadier-General Bartlett, formerly colonel of the Forty-ninth and Fifty-seventh Massachusetts Regiments. His father, Charles L. Bartlett, Esq., of Boston, was anxious to have his son exchanged, and for that purpose visited Washington, taking with him a letter, dated Aug. 9, from Governor Andrew to Major-General Hitchcock, who was Commissary-General of Prisoners. In this letter, the Governor thus speaks of General Bartlett:— He is in feeble health; lost a leg at Yorktown; was shot in three places at Port Hudson, disabling an arm, and had just joined his brigade, after receiving a severe wound in the head at the battle of the Wilderness, when he was ordered to the assault at Petersburg. His lameness, and his yet-unhealed wound received in May, render him a person peculiarly susceptible to the
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
y any bills contracted by the two military companies belonging to the town, as well before as after they shall be called into actual service. June 8th, The act of the Legislature concerning the payment of State aid to soldiers' families was adopted, and ten thousand dollars were appropriated to carry into effect its provisions. November 5th, The selectmen were authorized to send agents to the seat of war to look after and take care of our dead and wounded volunteers. December 14th, Dr. Alfred Hitchcock presented resolutions requesting the trustees of the Public Library to take measures to collect and preserve in some permanent form all interesting facts, correspondence, trophies, &c., which will perpetuate to future generations the history of the service in which the Fitchburg volunteers have been or may be engaged. Voted, to put one thousand dollars into the hands of Thomas R. Boutelle, Alvah Crocker, L. H. Bradford, Henry A. Willis, and Hanson L. Reed, to relieve incidental wants
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 18: the battle of Antietam. (search)
mmand of his new regiment, he was equally successful in securing the respect and confidence of all who came in contact with him. Said the Daily Journal on the same occasion, Col. Hinks was a brave and valuable officer, and is a great loss to the service as well as to the state of his nativity . . . . He displayed the qualities of a soldier, as well in the care of his men as in his bravery in the field, and he will be remembered with respect by all who served under him, . . . . . Dr. Alfred Hitchcock visited the field of Antietam, and in a letter to Governor Andrew, Sept. 26, 1862, this described the condition of Col. Hinks: Col. Hinks, poor fellow! seemed on Monday to have symptoms of sinking. His wound is through the abdomen and back, and a miracle only can save him. I advised against his proposed removal, as lessening the only possible chance for such a miracle to be wrought by Him in whose hand our breath is . . . . . . . . The following is an extract from an official let
......................................... 43 Hines, Henry.................................................... 249, 324 Hinks, Edward W., 1, 4, 6, 7, 9, 12, 13, 14, 16, 18, 20, 23, 25, 26, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 36, 37, 38, 41, 49, 50, 51, 53, 70, 78, 79, 82, 83, 93, 97, 106, 112, 114, 118, 121, 123, 126, 134, 135, 137, 138, 139, 140, 143, 147, 148, 191, 198, 201, 222, 296, 321 Hinks, Elisha A., 4, 50, 79, 112, 141, 144, 151, 163, 170, 187, 192, 198, 201, 261, 299, 319, 324, 334, 352 Hitchcock, Dr., Alfred,.................................................148 Hitchcock, Simon D.,............................................... 145 Hodges, John Jr.,...................................... 4, 7, 12, 35, 79, 112 Hodgkins, Joseph E.,....................189, 288, 320, 327, 338, 356, 358, 362 Hogan, John,.................................................. 104, 119 Hogan, Michael,...................................................... 291 Hogan, Stephen,.......................................