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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Edward D. Hobbs or search for Edward D. Hobbs in all documents.

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ned any serious purpose of making a home in Louisiana, the shock of his brother's untimely end turned him from it. In the winter of 1832-33 great commercial distress in Louisville would have prevented the sale of real estate for such investment. Mrs. Johnston seemed to be recovering her wonted health, and the spring and summer of 1833 were passed happily at Jefferson Barracks, with no greater anxiety than c a little cholera in St. Louis, of which Lieutenant Johnston writes to his friend, E. D. Hobbs, of Louisville, As we have seen it before in its worst form, we will meet it now with a steady front. This brief and touching minute, in Mrs. Johnston's handwriting, records the beginning of her final malady: I was taken ill on September 19, 1833, at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri. Came to Louisville October 4th. Maria Preston Johnston was born October 28, 1833, and returned to her Maker the 10th of the following August. The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away. Blessed be the n
al Johnston's view. hostility engendered toward him in the President. compliments from his army. visits New Orleans. effects of his wound. visits Kentucky. noticed by Jackson. Henry D. Gilpin's letter to him. return to Texas. letter to Mr. Hobbs. differences with the Administration. Indian negotiations. Essowakkeny, the Comanche. incident with General Johnston. the talk. their treachery. treaty. Indian cannibals. the little child's footprint. political overtures. Mexiextract is given not only as an index of his own spirit, but of that of the Texan people; and, also, as exhibiting the condition of the country, at the mercy, not only of invasion, but even of the rumor of invasion. It is from a letter to Mr. Edward D. Hobbs, of Louisville: City of Houston, December 31, 1837. my dear sir: A few hours after my arrival at this place, news reached us from San Antonio of the approach and investment of that devoted town by a large body of the enemy's cavalry.