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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 3 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 5, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Hockley or search for Hockley in all documents.

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but the voice of his army compelled him to confront the enemy, which he did on the 19th, on the San Jacinto River. On the 20th the cavalry, under Colonel Sherman, engaged the enemy; but the ardor of the Texan army was restrained by their commander until the afternoon of the 21st of April. On that morning the enemy were reinforced by 500 men under General Cos. At half-past 3, the Texans moved forward in line of battle. Colonel Burleson commanded the centre; Colonel Sherman, the left; Colonel Hockley, the artillery on the right; and, on his flank, Colonel M. B. Lamar, a troop of 61 cavalry. Sherman first encountered the enemy; and then the whole line burst impetuously upon the slight intrenchments thrown up by the Mexicans, with the war-cry: Remember the Alamo! Goliad and the Alamo! The combat lasted only eighteen minutes. It was a rout, not a battle. The Texans lost two killed and 21 wounded, six of them mortally. The Mexican loss was 630 killed, 208 wounded, and 730 prisoners
signation, which was again declined. By the advice of his surgeons, General Johnston spent the summer and fall in Kentucky. His correspondence shows that the friends of Texas deemed his services of the first importance to the republic. Colonel Hockley, eminent in the struggle for independence, whom General Johnston characterizes as one of the best officers and patriots in the army, writes from Nashville, November 5, 1837: I have just returned from the Hermitage, where I spent all last weeemy by the French blockade of the ports of Mexico. General Johnston, having no troops to command and no present occupation, again wished to resign, but was so strongly dissuaded that, in June, he accepted a furlough and went to Kentucky. Colonel Hockley, who had succeeded Mr. Bee as Secretary of War, informed General Johnston, August 21st, of Cordova's revolt, which ended in smoke, however; and, apprising him that he was authorized to retain such officers as were necessary, added, You hold