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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate States' flags. (search)
h Virginia, captured in cavalry engagement near Beverley Ford, June, 1863, by General Judson Kilpatrick, U. S. A. Ninth Virginia Infantry, captured July 3, 1863, at Gettysburg, by Private John E. Clopp, Company F, 71st Pennsylvania. Ninth Virginia Infantry, captured at Sailor's creek, April 6, 1865, by Corporal J. F. Benjamin, Company M (Harris), Volunteer Cavalry, 1st Brigade, 3d Division, Major-General Custer commanding. Sixth Virginia Infantry, captured July 30, 1864, by Corporal Franklin Hogan, Company A, 45th Pennsylvania Volunteers. Twelfth Virginia Infantry, captured in the battle of Sailor's creek, April 6, 1865, by First Lieutenant James H. Gibbon, Company C, 2d New York (Harris Light) Volunteer Cavalry, 1st Brigade, 3d Division. Fifth Virginia Cavalry, captured at Aldie, Va., June 17, 1863, by 1st Massachusetts Cavalry. Eighteenth Virginia Volunteers, time and place of capture not given. Twenty-fifth Virginia Volunteers, time and place of capture not giv
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.45 (search)
Only kindly admiration was expressed for gallant Scotchmen who died there. Nor is it expected of their descendants, our fellow citizens of to-day, as proof of present loyalty, that they shall condemn the action of their fathers. With General Frank Nash our kinsfolk went to death at Germantown, in the long ago. With Mad Anthony Wayne they went to that desperate bayonet charge at Stony Point; with Jethro Sumner at Eutaw Springs; with Morgan and Greene; with Davie, Davidson and Graham; with Hogan at Charleston-wherever duty called or danger was to be dared they were to be found until the end of that long struggle which ended successfully for them. Well, the swift years flew by, and in 1861 our State, whose behest we were ever taught is paramount to all, again summoned her sons to repel invasion and to uphold the right of self-government—and it cannot be too often or too strongly emphasized that they fought only to resist invasion and to vindicate the right of self-government—and in