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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died., List of Massachusetts officers and soldiers who died of wounds. (search)
20, 1864. Hoare, James,22d Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864.Alexandria, Va., Aug. 2, 1864. Hobart, David K., Also reported as dying as a prisoner, same date and place. 1st Sergt.,44th Mass. Inf.,– –Wilson, N. C., April 14, 1863. Hodge, George H., Corp.,57th Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.Arlington, Va., June 5, 1864. Hodgkins, Frederick,1st Mass. Cav.,Vaughan Road, Va.,Washington, D. C., Nov. 22, 1864. Hodgkins, Nathaniel, Sergt.,34th Mass. Inf.,– –Sept. 27, 1864. Hogan, James,56th Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va.,Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864. Hogan, Michael S., 1st Sergt.,10th Mass. Inf.,– –Washington, D. C., May 24, 1863. Holbrook, Adin,50th Mass. Inf.,– –Louisiana, March 19, 1863. Holbrook, Edward,40th Mass. Inf.,– –Washington, D. C., July 3, 1864. Holbrook, George,58th Mass. Inf.,Near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865.Washington, D. C., April 17, 1865. Holden, James,28th Mass. Inf.,– –June 18, 1863. Hollis, Henry S.,35th Mass. Inf.,Jackson, Mi
20, 1864. Hoare, James,22d Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864.Alexandria, Va., Aug. 2, 1864. Hobart, David K., Also reported as dying as a prisoner, same date and place. 1st Sergt.,44th Mass. Inf.,– –Wilson, N. C., April 14, 1863. Hodge, George H., Corp.,57th Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.Arlington, Va., June 5, 1864. Hodgkins, Frederick,1st Mass. Cav.,Vaughan Road, Va.,Washington, D. C., Nov. 22, 1864. Hodgkins, Nathaniel, Sergt.,34th Mass. Inf.,– –Sept. 27, 1864. Hogan, James,56th Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va.,Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864. Hogan, Michael S., 1st Sergt.,10th Mass. Inf.,– –Washington, D. C., May 24, 1863. Holbrook, Adin,50th Mass. Inf.,– –Louisiana, March 19, 1863. Holbrook, Edward,40th Mass. Inf.,– –Washington, D. C., July 3, 1864. Holbrook, George,58th Mass. Inf.,Near Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865.Washington, D. C., April 17, 1865. Holden, James,28th Mass. Inf.,– –June 18, 1863. Hollis, Henry S.,35th Mass. Inf.,Jackson, Mi
Hobbs, Curtis, 374 Hoben, John, 374 Hoben, Patrick, 374 Hockley, E. J., 374 Hodgdon, G. W., 437 Hodgdon, O. L., 374 Hodge, G. H., 461 Hodge, J. K., 374 Hodge, James, 562 Hodges, G. F., 34 Hodges, J. W., 374 Hodges, Joel, 374 Hodges, John, Jr., 308, 374 Hodges, W. T., 64, 66, 130, 374 Hodgkins, Frederick, 461 Hodgkins, Nathaniel, 461 Hodgman, Orin, 524 Hodgman, William, 374 Hoey, L. G., 524 Hoffman, Max, 374 Hogan, Benjamin, 374 Hogan, E. E., 374 Hogan, J. F., 376 Hogan, James, 461 Hogan, John, Corp., 28th Mass. Inf., 375 Hogan, John, 28th Mass. Inf., 375 Hogan, M. S., 461 Hogan, Patrick, 2d Mass. H. A., 524 Hogan, Patrick, 25th Mass. Inf., 524 Hogan, Patrick, 28th Mass. Inf., 375 Hogan, Stephen, 524 Hogan, Thomas, 375 Holl, H. A., 375 Hoitt, J. S., 524 Holbrook, Adin, 461 Holbrook, C. E., 15th Mass. Inf., 375 Holbrook, C. E., 25th Mass. Inf., 375 Holbrook, C. L., 152, 276 Holbrook, Charles, 524 Holbrook, Edward, 461 Holbrook, George, 461 Holb
Put to work --James Hogan, the traveling gentleman who was released by the Mayor last week on promising to leave the city, sought quarters in the First Station-House Sunday night, and yesterday morning was put to work on the streets.
enerally had sought other fields of vibration — when all was still, and Richmond, like a tired juvenile on its mother's breast, had sunk to rest — forth sallies James Hogan and yells like an infuriated tom-cat that had imbibed an electric eel or a magical imp of momentary mischief, which was striving, not in vain, to make itself helue of silence by the caution of "hark — the Watch!" Halloo he would, and continued so to do till the approaching guardian of the night acted as an extinguisher on Hogan, by enclosing his form within one of the cells of the first station-house. Within its quiet precincts balmy sleep soon over-powered the hitherto excitable gentlemthe hitherto excitable gentleman, and by morning he was reduced to such a state of penitence for "errors of the head, and not the heart," that the sitting magistrate, Alderman Sadler, was induced to let him slope with a gentle admonition. The entry on the cage book proclaims the fact that Hogan had been "acting very suspicio
Incorrigible. --James Hogan, an old toper, heretofore mentioned as having been in the lock-up for disturbing the peace of the city, was before the Recorder on Saturday for getting drunk and lying on the sidewalk Friday night. Failing to give $100 security, he was sent to prison, and ordered to be put to work for the space of 60 days ensuing.
Considering the state of excitement that our people ought naturally to be in, on account of the times, they keep tolerably quiet. Up to 4 o'clock yesterday evening, the only person who had been put in the cage for a breach of the peace, was James Hogan, who had been caught assaulting a female while drunk.
Beating a woman. --James Hogan, who has only been out of jail for a few days, was yesterday sent back by the Mayor, having been arrested for beating Bridget Moore, and resisting the officers who hastened to stop the ungallant procedure. Hogan was also assigned to the chain-gang for the space of 60 days, and commanded to work eight hours each day during that time. Beating a woman. --James Hogan, who has only been out of jail for a few days, was yesterday sent back by the Mayor, having been arrested for beating Bridget Moore, and resisting the officers who hastened to stop the ungallant procedure. Hogan was also assigned to the chain-gang for the space of 60 days, and commanded to work eight hours each day during that time.
Discharged. --James Hogan, arrested as a suspicious character, and having nowhere to stay, was before the Mayor yesterday, and on promising to leave the city at once, was released from custody.
James Hogan was arrested by officer Chalkley yesterday, on the charge which has made his name notorious in the Mayor's court — namely, drunkenness and disorderly conduct. He manifested his appreciation of his position by such hideous cries and outrageous conduct that his shoes were stripped off. He then beat and kicked the door of his room with his fists and feet until tired of the fun; for all of which he will be called to account this morning.
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