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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 3 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. T. Hogane or search for J. T. Hogane in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
to express to you their feelings of admiration and love; to tell you that they drew courage, energy, their reward, their pride, from your gallant acts, your heroic bearing, your friendly approbation? Boys of the Fifth Company, the spirits of Slocomb, Vaught and Blair at this moment marshal our brave who roam enfranchised, and reecho my words, rejoicing at this first reunion of the Fifth and its brothers of Virginia. May God bless you. Reminiscences of the siege of Vicksburg. By Major J. T. Hogane of the Engineer Corps. Paper no. 1. Let us revive from the forces of memory the particulars of a scene, remarkable for being an example and expression of weakness. On the west bank of the Big Black river, in the State of Mississippi, on a day of May, 1863, might have been seen General J. C. Pemberton and a group of disheartened staff and line officers. The surroundings and foil to this weary, discouraged group were the defeated troops just escaped from the field of combat at
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the siege of Vicksburg. (search)
Reminiscences of the siege of Vicksburg. By Major J. T. Hogane of the Engineer Corps. Paper no. 1. Let us revive from the forces of memory the particulars of a scene, remarkable for being an example and expression of weakness. On the west bank of the Big Black river, in the State of Mississippi, on a day of May, 1863, might have been seen General J. C. Pemberton and a group of disheartened staff and line officers. The surroundings and foil to this weary, discouraged group were the defeated troops just escaped from the field of combat at Champion Hills and Big Black river; the sluggish river; the blazing timber; the smoke of battle. General Pemberton, with head hung down and despair written over the lineaments of his face, gave utterance to the honest sentiment of his heart when he remarked to Colonel Lockett, the Chief Engineer of the army, that thirty years ago, to-day, I commenced my career as a soldier, and to-day ends it. What a confession of failure these pathet
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 48 (search)
Reminiscences of the siege of Vicksburg. Paper no. 2. By Major J. T. Hogane, of the Engineer Corps. The first man killed in Vicksburg was a Major of infantry belonging to General Vaughn's command. I had just reported to General Vaughn for duty as engineer officer of the line under command of Major-General Smith, and as a social recognition, he told me the news of the Major's death, how that he had crept between the opposing lines to relieve a wounded man, and there met his death. The angel of charity certainly had not far to come to meet him and to offer him the hand of fellowship. This fight was on the north side of Vicksburg, and outside the works proper. In company with a Lieutenant of engineers, I inspected the line of works to which I had been assigned, and was pleased with the strength of the natural position until I came to a depression in the line commanded by adjoining points. I asked the officer if he thought we could hold that position. Why not? he asked, and a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 77 (search)
Reminiscences of the siege of Vicksburg. Paper no. 3—(conclusion). By, Major J. T. Hogane, of the Engineer Corps. Nearly every evening about dusk there would be a cessation of firing by the sharp-shooters. Then the banter of the men on both sides would commence, and perhaps truces were made to meet outside of the works. One moonlight night I asked who the officer was in front, and after telling me his name, he invited me to a conference. We met in a ravine about one hundred feet from our line and talked faster in a given time than four men could have talked under less exciting conditions. This officer whose kindness I acknowledge, tendered me his note-book to write a letter to my wife, who over two years before, I had left in St. Louis. She answered it by way of a flag of truce and I got her letter in Richmond afterwards. Johnny Reb and Jonathan Fed had many a set-to, to see who could say the funniest things, or who could outwit the other in a trade, which generally ended b