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Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 2 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 22, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 39: Miscellaneous operations, land and sea.--operations in the Nansemond, Cape Fear, Pamunky, Chucka Tuck and James Rivers.--destruction of blockade-runners.--adventures of Lieutenant Cushing, etc. (search)
to pull for their lives. Some of the men, including the other guard, jumped overboard, and swam ashore, while Allen headed the boat towards the river-bank, landed at the foot of the line of breastworks, and delivered his one prisoner to the commanding officer of the fort. A short time afterwards, the fire reached the Underwriter's magazine, and she blew up. This gallant expedition was led by Commander John Taylor Wood, of the Confederate Navy, who was accompanied by Lieutenants Gardner, Hogue, Carr, and Wilkinson. Acting-Master Jacob Wester-velt, commanding the Underwriter, was killed on board that vessel, as also several of his crew. In this expedition fifteen boats, including three large barges, with three hundred men, came down the river with the intention of making a simultaneous attack on the forts and the gun-boat; but, finding the latter above the forts, where she ought not to have been, she was boarded and captured, with little loss to the enemy. It was to be expected