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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 119 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 116 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 94 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 48 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 47 11 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 36 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 2 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Robert F. Hoke or search for Robert F. Hoke in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Last days of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
ave been impossible to fill the depleted armies, or successfully prosecute further invasion. Another still more critical period arose in the latter part of the summer of 1864. In the spring of that year the Confederates had crushed an invading force in Florida, and practically ended the seige of Charleston. Banks had been defeated with great loss in his Red river campaign, and Sherman, after the defeat of his cavalry, compelled to fall back from his attempted invasion of Mississippi, and Hoke had captured Plymouth, and expelled the enemy from North Carolina, while the Confederates had met with no corresponding back-sets. Sherman had penetrated near Atlanta, but with considerable loss, and his ability to either capture the city or destroy Johnston's army was doubted, while few thought he could long maintain himself so far inland, and many believed he must finally retreat, which he could not do without great disaster. Grant had sustained fearful losses in the Wilderness, at Spot
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memorial address (search)
at splendid body of volunteers, that ultimately placed them at the head of companies, regiments, brigades and divisions. Among its originial officers were Major-General Hoke, Brigadier-Generals Lane and Lewis, Colonels Avery, Bridgers, Hardy, W. W. McDowell, J. C. S. McDowell, Starr, Pemberton, Fuller, and a score of others, whie the world as one of the best and bravest of all our leaders. It was this same gift that enabled General Hill to select from the lieutenants of his regiment Robert F. Hoke to be made major of his regiment over ten competent captains. It was this intuitive perception of persistent pluck, dash and coolness that prompted him to loring scenes of the last days of the Confederacy, Hill was not a man to sulk in his tent. Volunteering successively on the staff of his old friends, Beauregard and Hoke, who appreciated his advice and assistance, he showed himself ever ready to serve the cause in any capacity. The repeated and urgent requests of both Johnston a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General R. F. Hoke's last address [from the Richmond, Va., times, April 9, 1893.] (search)
General R. F. Hoke's last address [from the Richmond, Va., times, April 9, 1893.] To his division near Greensboro, N. C., May 1, 1865. As the 9th will be the anniversary of Lee's surrender, it will be in order to publish everything of historical interest pertaining to the closing scenes of the war between the States. I enclose you the farewell address of General R. F. Hoke, a gallant North Carolinian, and an uncle of the Secretary of the Interior, Hoke Smith, of whom the Northern papers wished to know something a short time since. General Lee sent General Hoke, with his division, to relieve Pickett's division, near Plymouth, N. C., where he (table grandeur. Its memories are part of the life of each one of us. But it is all over now. Yet, though the sad dark veil of defeat is over us, fear not the future, but meet it with manly hearts. You carry to your homes the heartfelt wishes of your General for your prosperity. My comrades, farewell! R. F. Hoke, Major General.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
0 Harvey, Bob, Heroic death of, 284. Hayne, Arthur P., 112 Herbert, Gen., Paul, 267. Heroine of Confederate Point, The, 258, 343. Heroes, Confederate, 294, 301, 374. Hill, General D. H, His admiration for Jackson, 25; address on Life and Character of, 110; his classmates at West Point, 113; his intuition as to military genius, 118, 340; his retreat before Sherman, 148; the alleged lost order, 131; his religious traits, 120. Hobart, Pasha, 264. Hoge, D. D., Rev. M. D, 264. Hoke, Last Address of General R. F., 297. Hood's Texas Brigade, 316. Howlett House, Capture of, 177. Hudgin, Captain, 179. Hughes, R M, his Life of J. E. Johnston, 314. Humphreys, cited, General, 61. Indian Poll Bridge, 327 Jackson, Major C. L., 304. Jackson, Gen. T J.; his system of combine, 38, 118; a Ride for him, 206; his widow described, 340. Jackson, Mrs. T. J., 340. Jackson and Lee, Characters of, 23. Jericho Ford, 318. Johnson, Gen., Edward, 239, 372. Johnston,