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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 17 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 24, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for W. J. Hoke or search for W. J. Hoke in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
fall back. This regiment here advanced boldly and maintained its ground well. * * * I should state, while relating the incidents of this day's battle, that Colonel Hoke, 38th North Carolina, was wounded, and had to leave the field. The Adjutant of the 38th was also wounded, but nobly maintained his post until after dark. Lieutenant-Colonel Armfield took command as soon as Colonel Hoke was wounded, which was soon after getting under fire. Adjutant Miles M. Cowles received a wound from which he soon died, the regiment losing one of its bravest officers. Lieutenant Covington, Company E, and Lieutenant Darden, Company D, were killed, and Lieutenants killed or wounded. About 420 men belonging to the regiment were engaged in the fight, the others being on picket. The loss was 152 in killed and wounded. Colonel Hoke in his report speaks in highest terms of the conduct of Captain B. H. Sumner, A. C. S., Sergeant-Major D. M. McIntyre, John Young, an attache to the regiment,