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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Chapter 4: up the St. John's. (search)
t, but soon let out the secret, and witticisms abounded for a day or two, the mildest of which was the assertion that the author of the alarm must have been three sheets in the wind. Another expedition was of more exciting character. For several days before the arrival of Colonel Rust a reconnoissance had been planned in the direction of the enemy's camp, and he finally consented to its being carried out. By the energy of Major Corwin, of the Second South Carolina Volunteers, aided by Mr. Holden, then a gunner on the Paul Jones, and afterwards made captain of the same regiment, one of the ten-pound Parrott guns had been mounted on a hand-car, for use on the railway. This it was now proposed to bring into service. I took a large detail of men from the two white regiments and from my own, and had instructions to march as far as thefour-mile station on the railway, if possible, examine the country, and ascertain if the Rebel camp had been removed, as was reported, beyond that dista
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Index. (search)
., Gen., 167, 168, 183, 235,237, 240. Goldsborough, Commodore, 243, 274. Goodell, J. B., Lt., 2. Goodrich, F. S., Lt., 271, 272. Gould, E., Corp., 274. Gould, F. M., Lt., 272. Greene, Sergt., 121. Hallett, Capt., 65, 66, 274. Hallowell, E. N., Gen., 225, 242, 244 Hartwell A. S., Gen., 286. Hawks, J. M., Surg., 269. Hawley, J. R., Gen., 81, 93, 107. Hayne, H. E., Sergt., 265. Hazard, Miles, 275. Heasley, A., Capt., 230, 270. Heron, Charles, 122. Hinton, R. J., Col., 277. Holden, Lt., 122. Hooper, C. W., Capt., 155, 237, 270, 271, 272. Hughes, Lt. Comr., 78 81, 82. Hunter, David Gen . 20, 15 43, 57 60, 61, 64 97, 98, 119 126, 129, 135, 136, 151, 68, 272 273 276. Hyde, E. W., Lt., 271, 272,294. Hyde, W. H., Lt., 76, 271. Jackson, A. W., Capt., 73, 76,270, 271, 272. James, William, Capt., 84, 170, 270. Johnston, J. F., Lt., 271. Jones, Lt., 76, 81. Kemble, Mrs., 67, 274. Kennon, Clarence, Corp., 275. King, T. B., 67. Lambkin, Prince, Corp, 109. Linco
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 46: correspondence between President Davis and Governor Z. B. Vance. (search)
e just learned that the Union or Reconstruction party propose holding meetings throughout the State. Trouble is fast brewing here, and I fear we shall soon have open resistance to the Government under the leadership of that reckless politician, Holden, Editor of the Standard. This is not the first intimation I have received that Holden is engaged in the treasononable purpose of exciting the people of North Carolina to resistance against their Government, and co-operation with the enemy; butHolden is engaged in the treasononable purpose of exciting the people of North Carolina to resistance against their Government, and co-operation with the enemy; but I have never received any definite statement of facts as to his conduct beyond the assertion that his newspaper, which I do not read, is filled with articles recommending resistance to the constituted authorities. I know not whether his hostility and that of his accomplices is directed against the Confederate Government alone, or embraces that of his State; nor am I aware whether he has gone so far as to render him liable to criminal prosecution. If, however, the facts stated in the ext
, cavalry came in sight, but a few well-directed volleys soon sent them galloping back in confusion to their stronghold at Ashepoo. At half-past 3 P. M, a battery of six pieces arrived and opened a brisk fire. Not a man flinched, but, from such hiding-places as they could find, poured volley after volley upon the gunners, killing and wounding a number. In the midst of this little engagement, the Harriet A. Weed came up, and a well-directed shell from her guns, under the direction of Captain Holden, caused a retreat of the rebel artillery. The raid upon this road then commenced in earnest. The soldiers scattered in every direction, and burned and destroyed every thing of value they came across. Thirty-four large mansions known to belong to notorious rebels, with all their rich furniture and rare works of art, were burned to the ground. Nothing but smouldering ruins and parched and crisped skeletons of once magnificent old oak and palmetto groves now remain of these delightful c
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 25 (search)
he Confederate army. They had come with a flag of truce, to which they were not entitled; still, in the interest of peace, I respected it, and permitted them to return to Raleigh with their locomotive, to assure the Governor and the people that the war was substantially over, and that I wanted the civil authorities to remain in the execution of their office till the pleasure of the President could be ascertained. On reaching Raleigh I found these same gentlemen, with Messrs. Badger, Bragg, Holden, and others, but Governor Vance had fled, and could not be prevailed on to return, because he feared an arrest and imprisonment. From the Raleigh newspapers of the 10th I learned that General Stoneman, with his division of cavalry, had come across the mountains from East Tennessee, had destroyed the railroad at Salisbury, and was then supposed to be approaching Greensboroa. I also learned that General Wilson's cavalry corps was smashing things down about Selma and Montgomery, Alabama, and
, your obd't serv't, W. L. Cabell, Brigadier-General Commanding North-West Arkansas. To Colonel M. La Rue Harrison, Commanding Post of Fayetteville. Headquarters Post, Fayetteville, Ark., April 19, 1863. Brigadier-General W. L. Cabell, Commanding. General: In reply to despatches from you by hand of Captain Alexander, bearing flag of truce, I would respectfully state that the dead of your command have all been decently buried in coffins. The wounded are in charge of Surgeons Russell and Holden, having been removed to our general hospital by my order. They are receiving every attention that men can receive, abundance of medicines, surgical instruments and subsistence stores having been placed under the control of your surgeons. Rest assured, General, that your wounded shall receive the best of care, such as we would hope to have from you were we placed in a like situation. Under the circumstances, I consider it unnecessary to retain your flag, and therefore return it. You
Pickett, George C. Joslin, Orson Moulton, Elijah A. Harkness, lieutenants,—all of Worcester. Company B, Holden Rifles, Holden. Officers: Joseph H. Gleason, of Holden, captain: Phineas R. Newell, Holden; Edward F. Devens, Charlestown; Samuel F. WooHolden, captain: Phineas R. Newell, Holden; Edward F. Devens, Charlestown; Samuel F. Woods, Barre; George Bascom, Holden, lieutenants. Company C, Emmet Guards, Worcester. Officers: Michael P. McConville, captain; Michael O'Driscoll, Matthew J. McCafferty, Thomas O'Neil, and Maurice Melvin, lieutenants,—all of Worcester. Company DHolden; Edward F. Devens, Charlestown; Samuel F. Woods, Barre; George Bascom, Holden, lieutenants. Company C, Emmet Guards, Worcester. Officers: Michael P. McConville, captain; Michael O'Driscoll, Matthew J. McCafferty, Thomas O'Neil, and Maurice Melvin, lieutenants,—all of Worcester. Company D, Boston. Officers: Albert Dodd, captain; Charles Dodd, Cornelius G. Atwood, George A. Hicks, and Joseph Nason, lieutenants,—all of Boston. Company D was raised in Boston on the morning of the 19th of April, by the gentlemen who were afterwards coHolden, lieutenants. Company C, Emmet Guards, Worcester. Officers: Michael P. McConville, captain; Michael O'Driscoll, Matthew J. McCafferty, Thomas O'Neil, and Maurice Melvin, lieutenants,—all of Worcester. Company D, Boston. Officers: Albert Dodd, captain; Charles Dodd, Cornelius G. Atwood, George A. Hicks, and Joseph Nason, lieutenants,—all of Boston. Company D was raised in Boston on the morning of the 19th of April, by the gentlemen who were afterwards commissioned its officers. It was attached to the Third Battalion, and left Boston in the steamer Cambridge on the 2d of May for Fortress Monroe, and from thence by the Potomac River to Washington. The vessel sailed from Boston with sealed instr
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Chapter 5: Lowell (search)
, but it is probable that his father then resided in Boston, while his elder brother, Charles Russell Lowell, occupied Elmwood. The great and even controlling influence exercised upon Lowell from this time by his betrothed, Maria White, who afterward became his wife, is well known, and the simplicity of their daily life is well portrayed in the following extracts from a sort of diary communicated by Lowell about the year 1849 to his friend, Charles F. Briggs, of New York, who then edited Holden's Magazine. By a letter from Briggs to R. W. Griswold Letters of R. W, Griswold, p. 257. it would appear that he was in charge of it in January, 1850, which must have been about the time of this letter. There is not, I think, in all Mr. Norton's delightful collection of Lowell's correspondence anything quite so thoroughly local, or giving so close a glimpse of Old Cambridge. The editor's preface is as follows:-- A Pepysian letter. Just as we had taken up our pen to go on with
eon, Clement. Doolan, Patrick. Dustin, Redford. Dupee, Louis. Ellis, Obed. Essler, Jno. Died since muster out. Esterbrook, Wm. H. Eton, Edwin D. Fannin, Joseph. Fischer, Henry B. Gardiner, Jno. Galliff, Geo. H. Gordon, Jno. Killed or died in hospital. Griffin, Ira. Hall, Albert F. Killed or died in hospital. Hatch, Albert P. Helmer, J. Herron, Wm. Hewitt, Chas. B. Higgins, Fred T. Horrigan, Jno. Horrigan, Michael. Holden, Jas. Hudson, Wm. J. Huntington, Chas. Irish, Millard F. Isaacs, Wm. H. Killed or died in hospital. Kelly, Michael. Kelly, Patrick. Kelly, William. King, Z. Laughlin. Lemay, Peter. Longfellow, Ernest. Commissioned, later. Libby, Geo. Maine, Jno. W. Maine, Joseph. Martineau. Millett, Geo. L. Miller. Mitchell, Lawrence. Moore, Ira. Murphy, David S. Murphy, Jno. Neville, Thos. Killed or died in hospital. Parlowe, H
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill), A guide to Harvard College. (search)
-16-11). Back of Hollis is Holden Chapel which was built in 1744 by Benjamin Coleman and named for another London family who befriended Harvard. For twenty-two years prayers were held here, but now for many years the building has been used for examinations and for a few recitations. The Holden coat-of-arms may still be seen on the western front, and a noteworthy fact about the building is that it stands to-day almost exactly as it was built so many years ago. In the space enclosed by Holden, Hollis and Harvard stands the Class Day Tree, a fine old elm which has witnessed the scrambles of many a graduating class. At four o'clock, the loveliest hour of the June afternoon, daintily gowned maids and matrons, forming a very enthusiastic and expectant audience, gather about the tree, which is encircled with a wreath of flowers at a distance of about eight feet from the ground. The air resounds with the class cheers of the undergraduates and alumni who form groups on the greensward
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