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a separate town under the name of Brighton. In 1873, Brighton was annexed to Boston. It was in the natural course of things that these outlying districts should with increase of population become organized at first into independent parishes and afterward into separate towns. In 1650, they were little else but wilderness. The palisades were needed to protect Cambridge from wild beasts much more than from any human foes. On February 13, 1665, we find the constables ordered to allow Justinian Holden ten shillings towards a wolf, killed partly in Watertowne and partly in this. It would be interesting to know on just what principle the locality of that brute's death was divided. In 1690, the town treasurer allows £ 1 per wolf for 52 wolves killed by Englishmen, but an Indian for the same service gets only half price. In 1696, the reward for killing 76 wolves was 13s. 4d. per head. Bears also roamed in the woods, and persons were sometimes killed by them, but the appearance of a b
from it. My birthplace, the home of my childhood and earlier and later boyhood, has within a few months passed out of the ownership of my family into the hands of that venerable Alma Mater who seems to have renewed her youth, and has certainly repainted her dormitories. This was written in 1872. In truth, when I last revisited that familiar scene and looked upon the flammantia moenia of the old halls, Massachusetts with the dummy clock-dial, Harvard with the garrulous belfry, little Holden with the sculptured unpunishable cherubs over its portal, and the rest of my early brick-and-mortar acquaintances, I could not help saying to myself that I had lived to see the peaceable establishment of the Red Republic of Letters. The estate was the third lot of the eighth Squadron (whatever that might be), and in the year 1707 was allotted in the distribution of undivided lands to Mr. ffox, the Reverend Jabez Fox, of Woburn, it may be supposed, as it passed from his heirs to the first
That the Great Swamp lying within the bounds of this town, on the east side of Fresh Pond meadow and Winottomie Brook, shall be divided into particular allotments and propriety. March 23, 1662-3. Ordered, that if any man be convicted that his dog is used to pull off the tails of any beasts, and do not effectually restrain him, he shall pay for every offence of that kind twenty shillings, in case that further complaint be made. Feb. 13, 1664-5. The Constables are ordered to allow Justinian Holden ten shillings towards a wolf, killed partly in Watertowne and partly in this. May 8, 1671. Granted to William Barrit and Nathaniell Hancock, to dig a sluice, to drain the pond by their houses, in the town's land, provided they secure it from doing damage as soon as may be: and in case the Townsmen see reason for it, they are to stop it up again. This pond was on the easterly side of Dunster Street, about midway between Mount Auburn and Harvard Streets. May 29, 1671. A committee
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 15: ecclesiastical History. (search)
the fore gallery on the south side. Joanna Winship, in the place where Ester Sparhauke was wont to sit. Mary Lemon, where old sister Jackson was wont to sit. Mr. Day, to sit in the 2d seat from the table. Ens. Samuel Greene, to sit at the table. Ri. Bobbins, to sit in the place where Ens. Greene was wont to sit. Jno. Gibson, where Mr. Day was wont to sit. Richard Eccles, where John Gibson was wont to sit. Benj. Crackbone, where Richard Eccles was wont to sit. Justinian Holden, to sit in the foremost seats. Robert Stedman, to sit in the second seats. Goode Gates, at the end of the Deacons seats. Almost all the congregation either walked to the meetinghouse, or rode on horseback. For the accommodation of equestrians, in mounting, dismounting, and passing between their beasts and the house, Nov. 20, 1665, The Townsmen do order the Constables to make a convenient horse-block at the meetinghouse, and causeway to the door. And to secure order in the ho
Batherick [or Baverick], Richard Beach, Joseph Bemis, William Bordman, Francis Bowman, Matthew Bridge, Thomas Brown, Samuel Buck, Samuel Bull, Samuel Champney, James Cheever, Joseph Cooke, Stephen Cooke, Benjamin Crackbone [killed], John Cragg, James Cutler, Samuel Cutler, John Druse [killed], Jonathan Dunster, Thomas Foster, Stephen Francis, Thomas Frost, Simon Gates, John Gibson, Samuel Gibson, Samuel Goffe, Nathaniel Green, John Hastings, Nathaniel Healy, Zachariah Hicks, Jacob Hill, Justinian Holden, Sebeas Jackson, Ambrose McFassett, Daniel Magennis, Amos Marrett, Thomas Mitchelson, John Needham, Thomas Oliver, Zachariah Paddlefoot, John Park, Solomon Phipps, Henry Prentice, James Prentice, Solomon Prentice, William Reed, Samuel Robbins, Jason Russell, William Russell, John Smith, Joseph Smith, Nathaniel Smith, Samuel Smith, John Squire, John Stedman, Andrew Stimson [or Stevenson], John Streeter, Gershom Swan, John Wellington, Jacob Willard, John Winter. Captain Daniel Gookin
ster Street, about one hundred feet northerly from Mount Auburn Street, where he subsequently resided. A few months before his death, he sold this estate to Justinian Holden. He was a carpenter, and d. between 15 Oct. 1666 and 2 Ap. 1667, a. about 80; Abigail, prob. his w., d. 22 Oct. 1657. In his will, dated 27 Sept. 1665, hein, b. 28 May 1679; Samuel, b. 28 May 1681; Edward, b. 3 Mar. 1683-4; Hannah, b. 31 May 1689. Jonathan the f. deposed 1696 (then aged 49) that he lived with Justinian Holden when he was 17 years old. 4. Martin, aged 40, came to New England in 1635 with w. Rachel, and settled at Braintree. His w. d. 15 Sept. 1651, and he m. Ele Boston News Letter, March 19, 1772, contains this paragraph: Died at Cambridge the present year 1772, Mrs. Thwing aged 101 in Jan., Mrs. Williams 102 in Feb., Mr. Holden 96 Mar. 8th. Still living in Cambridge, Mrs. Mayo in her 102d year. This statement varies only one year from the fact; Abigail, dau. of Simon Gates, who m. Na
. to Hartford with Hooker. After his decease; his widow Bethia m. David Phillips of Milford. The town of Hartford, in 1664, offered him £ 10 to remove from Hartford with his wife. Hinman. Kempster, Daniel, in 1642 res. on the southerly side of the Common, near Appian Way. In 1644 he bought an estate on the westerly side of Dunster Street, about one hundred feet northerly from Mount Auburn Street, where he subsequently resided. A few months before his death, he sold this estate to Justinian Holden. He was a carpenter, and d. between 15 Oct. 1666 and 2 Ap. 1667, a. about 80; Abigail, prob. his w., d. 22 Oct. 1657. In his will, dated 27 Sept. 1665, he bequeaths sundry articles to his cousin Thomas Moulton, his kinsman Samuel Andrew, the daughter of his brother John Kempster, sometime of Needum, England, deceased, Anna, daughter of Thomas Parke of Dunstable, England, and Elder Frost: and the residue to such as shall tender me, and show me kindness, in my sickness and old age.
an, twins, b. 25 Oct. 1673; Thomas, b. 10 Mar. 1674-5; John, b. 25 Mar. 1677; Benjamin, b. 28 May 1679; Samuel, b. 28 May 1681; Edward, b. 3 Mar. 1683-4; Hannah, b. 31 May 1689. Jonathan the f. deposed 1696 (then aged 49) that he lived with Justinian Holden when he was 17 years old. 4. Martin, aged 40, came to New England in 1635 with w. Rachel, and settled at Braintree. His w. d. 15 Sept. 1651, and he m. Elizabeth, widow of Roger Bancroft of Camb., and d. 4 Aug. 1658. He was the ancestor o of Cambridge died in the CVI year of her age. This date of death is too early; the Boston News Letter, March 19, 1772, contains this paragraph: Died at Cambridge the present year 1772, Mrs. Thwing aged 101 in Jan., Mrs. Williams 102 in Feb., Mr. Holden 96 Mar. 8th. Still living in Cambridge, Mrs. Mayo in her 102d year. This statement varies only one year from the fact; Abigail, dau. of Simon Gates, who m. Nathaniel Sparhawk and Joseph Mayo, was b. 14 Aug. 1671, and had not fully attained 10
6. Hazeltine, 221. Healy, 75, 216, 18, 373. Hearsey, 310. Heate, 11, 32. Heath, 410, 11, 16, 27. Hedge, 231, 369. Henbury, 76. Henchman, 393. Hendley, 320. Henley, 427. Herrick, 310. Hervey, 323. Hicks, 75, 108, 227, 92, 412– 14. Higginson, 236, 9. Hildreth, 57. Hiler, 321. Hill, 62, 180, 3, 204, 5, 7, 19, 20, 37, 93, 305, 425, 6, 8, 44. Hilliard, 45, 209, 31, 2, 97– 99, 303-5. Hinkley, 114, 338. Hoar, 274. 5, 368. Hobart, 81. Holden, 5, 97, 263. Holland, 322, 34. Holley, 355. Hollis, 76. Holman, 35, 58, 75, 324, 55– 64. Holmes, 2, 23, 54, 8, 76,176, 8, 94, 9, 220, 31-3, 6, 47, 53, 9, 60, 90, 1,6,8,300-3, 11, 14, 73, 6, 7. Holt, 226. Holyoke, 132, 3, 5, 287-9, 93. Homer, 306. Hooker, 2, 10, 16, 26-37, 46, 50, 1, 90, 247, 8, 51, 4, 8, 9, 60. Hooton, 345-7. Hopkins, 32, 377-9. Hoppin, 307, 9. Horton, 345, 6. Hosmer, 11, 32, 6, 185, 233. Houghton, 222. Hovey, 131, 2, 77, 224, <
Hinckson, 585. Harrington. Hoar, 585. Cotton. Usher. Holden, 585-7. Adams. Beal. Boyden. Bradshaw. Clark. Cra. Hooker. Phillips. Kempster, 595. Andrew. Frost. Holden. Moulton. Parke. Kendall, 595. Holley. Jackson. K. Haley. Hall. Hancock. Haskell. Haynes. Hill. Holden. Hovey. Hubbard. Hyde. Ireland. Jackson. Johnson.ck. Harrington. Hastings. Hill. Hobart. Holbrook. Holden. Howe. Hubbard. Hutchinson. Jones. Lawrence. Lock Saunders, 651, 2. Ball. Bancroft. Bartlett. Flagg. Holden. Penniman. Prentiss. Savil. Spear. Whittemore. Wi Cooper. Cutting. Dana. Gardner. Gates. Hancock. Holden. Holmes. Houghton. Jarvis. Mayo. Murdock. Newman.ittlestone. Convers. Cook. Crosby. Cutter. Hinds. Holden. Mansur. Palfrey. Parks. Patten. Polley. Pratt.
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