Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Holland or search for Holland in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
d asked if he could recommend any clever young Scotch medical man to accompany him to Spain.—Sydney Smith's Memoir, by Lady Holland, Chap. II. Lady Holland treated him quite unceremoniously,—according to Macaulay, like a negro slave.—Trevelyan's LifLady Holland treated him quite unceremoniously,—according to Macaulay, like a negro slave.—Trevelyan's Life of Macaulay, Vol. I. Chap. IV. Allen was not a believer in the Christian religion, and on this subject gave a tone to the conversation of Holland House.—Greville's Memoirs, Chap. XXX., Dec. 16, 1835. the friend of Lord Holland. Mr. Hallam, howend of scholars, and a kindly host. See sketch in Brougham's Autobiography, Vol. III. p. 298. There is a reference to Lady Holland's career in Life of Lord Denman, Vol. II. p. 119. Macaulay, a welcome and frequent guest at Holland House, commemoratIf I should ever be able to visit England again, I should find many places where I might hope to be welcome. Lord and Lady Holland have warmly asked me to let them know when I come to London again, and Lord Lansdowne has done the same; and to-d
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 27, 1839. (search)
of Inquiry into the Rise and Growth of the Royal Prerogative in England. Sydney Smith introduced him to Lord Holland, who had asked if he could recommend any clever young Scotch medical man to accompany him to Spain.—Sydney Smith's Memoir, by Lady Holland, Chap. II. Lady Holland treated him quite unceremoniously,—according to Macaulay, like a negro slave.—Trevelyan's Life of Macaulay, Vol. I. Chap. IV. Allen was not a believer in the Christian religion, and on this subject gave a tone to thLady Holland treated him quite unceremoniously,—according to Macaulay, like a negro slave.—Trevelyan's Life of Macaulay, Vol. I. Chap. IV. Allen was not a believer in the Christian religion, and on this subject gave a tone to the conversation of Holland House.—Greville's Memoirs, Chap. XXX., Dec. 16, 1835. the friend of Lord Holland. Mr. Hallam, however, thought it was not by him, but by a Spaniard who is in England. I shall undoubtedly be able to let you know by my next letter. Mr. Ford, the writer of the Spanish articles in the Quarterly, has undertaken to review Prescott's book for that journal: whether his article will be ready for the next number I cannot tell. Prescott ought to be happy in his honorable
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 20: Italy.—May to September, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
ear a winter damp or chill. Of society I have seen little, except incidentally, though I have known many individuals. In Naples I did not trouble myself to leave a single letter of introduction. In Rome, the Princess Borghese died two days after my arrival; the French Ambassador had left for the summer before I came. The Countess of Coventry Lady Coventry was the daughter of Aubrey, sixth Duke of St. Albans, and the wife of George William, eighth Earl of Coventry, and the mother of Lady Holland. She died in 1845. Mr. Milnes (Lord Houghton) gave Sumner a letter of introduction to her. had retired to Albano, where she invited me to visit her: I did not go. Others had fled in different directions. In Florence, the Marquesa Lenzonis Medicis—the last of this great family—invited me to her soirees:I went to one. The Marquis Strozzi called upon me: I had not the grace to return his call. The Count Graberg 1776-1847; a distinguished geographer, at one time Swedish Consul in Tripo
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 28: the city Oration,—the true grandeur of nations.—an argument against war.—July 4, 1845.—Age 34. (search)
some time after, that an anti-war society is as little practicable as an anti-thunder-and-lightning society. Works, Vol. II. p. 180. Mr. Mason's Memoir and Correspondence, p. 349. Dr. Lieber also stated frankly his dissent. But no expression of opposite views troubled Sumner so much as Horace Mann's. He had counted on the sympathy of one so deeply interested in the welfare of mankind. Mr. Mann questioned Sumner's definition of war, maintaining that it had been sometimes waged, as by Holland against Spain, to repel injustice, not to establish justice; and that the Poles and Southern negroes would, with an even chance of success, be justified in an appeal to arms. In October, a reply to the oration,—a pamphlet of thirty-one pages,—well written and trenchant in style, was published in Boston without a name. The author treated logically Sumner's positions, and contended also, with ample reference to the examples of history, that war is not an unmixed evil. The Boston Post als