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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 21 3 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 19 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 11 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 24, 1861., [Electronic resource] 9 3 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 6 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 17, 1861., [Electronic resource] 5 5 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 14, 1861., [Electronic resource] 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Hollins or search for Hollins in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 2 document sections:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the first autumn. (search)
n the attack on Kinburn, a vessel which should defy the Federal artillery. Captain Hollins, a former officer of the regular navy, was entrusted with the task of thusilla of seven small armed steamers was collected to support her operations. Hollins had been for some days watching the movements of the Federals, who were beginnas a rocket from the Manassas should announce the commencement of the battle. Hollins's ram arrived unperceived at the Tete-des-Passes in the midst of the Federal v coaling-brig, which had been separated from the Richmond; and the flotilla of Hollins followed the enemy at a distance. Everything seemed to be in his favor; the P on her beam-ends, while the Richmond was stranded a little lower down; and if Hollins had been bolder, he could probably have destroyed both vessels. Fortunately, were promptly repaired, and it resumed its place at the Tete-des-Passes, while Hollins was pompously announcing a victory, the worthlessness of which was soon felt b
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book V:—the first winter. (search)
ies which completed the system of defence on the left bank of the river. Commodore Hollins had brought a few iron-clad vessels from New Orleans to support them, but himself to be shut up like Floyd in entrenchments. The six gun-boats of Commodore Hollins, which had arrived from New Orleans to support the army of Beauregard, an, besides the field artillery, were armed with sixteen guns of large calibre. Hollins's gunboats, anchored in an elbow of the river, had complete command of the lowm their works. They immediately opened a brisk cannonade against the latter. Hollins's gun-boats came down from Island No.10 to participate in a fight which seemedtuted the armament of the seven forts which the bombardment had not damaged. Hollins, being in turn blockaded by the occupancy of New Madrid, endeavored to destroy the war before the end of 1861 met with but little success. We have seen how Hollins could attempt nothing serious with the Manassas at New Orleans, and that Foote