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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 37 3 Browse Search
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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
the laurels he won at Vienna, Bull Run and Manassas. Captain Holmes and Lieutenants Doby and W. M. Dwight, of the staff, wA. P. Hill down the Darbytown to the Long Bridge road; and Holmes to cross from the south side of the James and march down te to come into effective battle on Longstreet's right, but Holmes, moving on Malvern hill, saw that he had not force sufficianxiously to hear from Huger on his left, and Magruder and Holmes on his right. He felt sure that Jackson, crossing White Ot up his whole army. He resolved to attack with Magruder, Holmes and Huger; holding A. P. Hill and Longstreet in reserve. rter's position—the strongest on Malvern hill—supported by Holmes, whose small division was in line on Magruder's right, facack was planned by Lee to be general along his whole line; Holmes, then Magruder, then Huger, then Jackson. In spite of McCf all this, no attack was made until late in the evening. Holmes did not attack at all, deeming it perfect madness; Magrude
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
g, and remained on that duty all day. The Third battalion was also detailed for special duty at Howison's mill, on Hazel run, and was not with the brigade in the engagement. In the Seventh, Capts. Benjamin Roper and T. A. Hudgens and Lieut. J. C. Lovelace were wounded. In the Eighth most of the casualties were met while the regiment was taking position and exposed to the enemy's view. In the Fifteenth, Lieuts. B. P. Barron and J. A. Derrick were wounded. Of the general staff, Adjt.-Gen. C. R. Holmes, Lieut. A. E. Doby, Lieut. J. A. Myers and Lieut. W. M. Dwight were specially mentioned. Doby's gallant and efficient conduct in directing the posting of troops under fire is particularly referred to by the regimental commanders. Dwight, not yet recovered from his injuries on Maryland heights, was again at his post, and was wounded by a fragment of shell. The Georgians and Carolinians who defended the stone wall against the assaults of eight divisions, with their powerful artille
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 11: (search)
ssouri, which, with the Seventeenth Iowa, Eightieth Ohio, Thirty-sixth Illinois, and Company E, of the Twenty-fourth Missouri, made up the Second brigade: Colonel Holmes, commanding the brigade, now ordered bayonets fixed and a charge made upon the enemy. The troops moved forward at double-quick, cheering wildly, driving in fer near his left, having a good range across the open field. The disposition of my troops was as follows: Boomer's brigade on the left of the road in the timber; Holmes' brigade on his right, in the open fields; Sanborn's brigade on the right of Holmes, with skirmishers well out on his flank; John E. Smith's brigade, Logan's diviHolmes, with skirmishers well out on his flank; John E. Smith's brigade, Logan's division, in the woods in rear of Boomer, about 400 yards, in column of regiments as a reserve; Stevenson's brigade across a ravine on Boomer's left, with directions to advance and gain a road which entered the city from the northwest; Dennis' brigade remained a short distance in the rear to guard the trains. Six brigades arrayed
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
front of Snodgrass hill, and others of that gallant brigade sealed their devotion to duty with their heart's blood. In the report of General Kershaw, the following officers are mentioned for gallant and noteworthy conduct: Lieutenant-Colonel Bland and Major Hard of the Seventh; Captain Townsend of the Third battalion; Col. James D. Nance of the Third regiment; Lieut.-Col. Franklin Gaillard of the Second; Col. John W. Henagan of the Eighth, and Col. Joseph F. Gist of the Fifteenth; Capts. C. R. Holmes, H. L. Farley, and W. M. Dwight of the brigade staff, and Couriers M. F. Milam, Company A, Third battalion, and Rawlins Rivers, Company I, Second regiment; both killed carrying General Kershaw's orders on the field. General Gist mentioned Maj. B. B. Smith, Capt. M. P. King, and Lieuts. L. M. Butler and J. C. Habersham, of his staff, for efficiency and gallant conduct; Col. C. H. Stevens and Lieut.-Col. Ellison Capers, Twenty-fourth, for the same; and Adjt. J. O. Palmer and Capt. D.
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 19: (search)
ina. On the left of his regiment Colonel Capers had made a barricade of logs, at right angles to the line, as a protection against a fire from the west side of the cut. Assisted by the adjutant-general of the brigade, Maj. B. B. Smith, and Lieutenant Holmes, adjutant of the Twenty-fourth, Colonel Capers rallied his companies, which, led by their commanding lieutenants, Easterling (Company B), Beckham (Company G) and Seigler (Company K), charged the barricade, drove Kimball's men out, and reoccn flags, reported by courier to General Gist, who sent him a dispatch to hold the gap as long as he could, but not to lose his regiment. It was then about II o'clock, and Roddey was skirmishing heavily. Colonel Capers sent his adjutant-general, Holmes, to Roddey. Just as that officer had returned and was talking to the colonel, the enemy was heard to raise a shout from the direction of both flanks of Roddey's force, and suddenly the firing ceased. In a few minutes some men of Companies A an
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 21: (search)
juncture the enemy pressed upon the flank and rear of his advance, and many men were cut off. Captain Wood, adjutant-general of Manigault's brigade, brought out 10 men and 8 prisoners, after a tiresome march all night around the Yankee forces. Gen. John D. Kennedy commanded Kershaw's old brigade, and he and his veterans did gallant service. General Kennedy complimented Lieutenant-Colonel Wallace, commanding the Second regiment, for skill and gallantry, and mentioned particularly, Capt. C. R. Holmes, assistant adjutant-general, Lieutenant Harllee, acting assistant inspector-general, Lieutenant Sill, acting on staff, and C. Kennison, acting aide-de-camp; also the good conduct and coolness in bearing dispatches of Sergeant Blake and Corporal Pinckney of the Second South Carolina. Lieutenant-Colonel Roy, in the advance, was for a time on the left of the brigade, gallantly inspiriting the men. During the operations just narrated, Hagood's brigade had been engaged, under Hoke and
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
He was slightly wounded at Kinston. His services were entirely in South and North Carolina. He is commander of Charles Rutledge Holmes camp, U. C. V., of Waterloo, and was appointed a major in the State militia on the staff of General Nicholson, bns & Cogsdell. He is a valued member of the Palmetto Guards camp, U. C. V., of which he was the first adjutant. Charles R. Holmes, born at Charleston in 1845, and now a prominent man of that city, is worthy of note among the gallant youth of thed. He started with General Hampton's escort, at the last, to seek the Trans-Mississippi, and with his younger brother, C. R. Holmes, of F troop, Sixth South Carolina cavalry, and Captain Shadborne, Hampton's chief of scouts, and his command, proceedeis still a member. In the fall of 1898 he was again elected to the legislature. Colonel Wharton is chaplain of Charles Rutledge Holmes camp No. 746, U. C. V., of Waterloo. He was a member of the State constitutional convention of 1895, and is pre