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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
tween Richmond and Petersburg until December, 1864, when he was sent to Fort Fisher. There he experienced the two terrific bombardments by the Federal fleet, and the final assault, in which he was captured. He was held as a prisoner of war at Elmira, N, Y., until the latter part of June, 1865, when he returned to Spartanburg, and in the following December again made his home at Charleston. Mr. Holmes is the only survivor of six brothers in the Confederate service, the others being: Edmund Green Holmes, of the Charleston light dragoons, who died in 1889; Robert L. Holmes, of the Carolina light infantry, killed at Castle Pinckney, January 7, 1861; Thomas G. Holmes, also of the light dragoons, killed at Hawe's Shop, Va., in 1864; Philip G. Holmes, of the light infantry, killed at Cold Harbor, 1862; and James B. Holmes, who served on the coast and died from disease in 1863. William Hood, a gallant ex-Confederate soldier, was born in Chester county, S. C., near Hopewell, July 27, 183