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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Malvern HillJuly 1, 1862. (search)
early on Monday morning, the enemy in his front having retreated via White Oak, marched his whole command over to the Darbytown road, and at 2 o'clock reached Timberlake's Store. At 4 o'clock he was ordered to New Market to the assistance of General Holmes. Between sunset and dark his front brigades were forming in the dense woods bordering the Long Bridge road, with the view of rendering this assistance. After dark, he was ordered to Longstreet; and, weary and footsore, these men marched to troops, many of whom had never been in line of battle, and they confronted the regulars of the United States army. It requires experience and drill to make efficient soldiers, even of material such as Hill and Magruder commanded that day. General Holmes, commanding a division of 6,000 effective men, occupied a position on the River road on our extreme right. The day before, he had a slight engagement with Warren's Brigade, and suffered the loss of two killed and forty wounded, and his reque
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.25 (search)
Boy heroes of Cold Harbor. [from the Sunday news, Charleston, S. C., July 25, 1897.1 How Taylor, Hayne, Pinckney and Gadsden Holmes died. Colonel Edward McCrady, after Consultation with Captains Armstrong, Kelly, Hasell, Hutson and Dr. Frost, tells the story of the Heroism of the four Young South Carolinians who fell at Cold Harbor supporting the colors of the 1st regiment, S. C. V.—The gallant Dominick Spellman, of the Irish Volunteers. The following interesting letter of Colonel er point of difference. On the one hand it is said that Philip Gadsden Holmes, also of Company L, took them up and immediately fell under three mortal wounds. I am inclined, however, to believe that this is a mistake; that the fact was that Gadsden Holmes was, at the moment he was shot, just behind the colors, endeavoring himself to get a deliberate aim at the advancing enemy. Then Dominick Spellman, one of the heroes of our war, a member of the Irish company, raised the colors and gloriousl
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
Georgia Battalion, Captain Doyle; 3rd Louisiana Battalion, Lieutenant-Colonel Bridford. On April 8th, the 45th Georgia, Colonel Hardiman, and on April 10th, 49th Georgia, Colonel Lane, were attached to the brigade. While here the troops received news of the passage of the conscript law, which gave some dissatisfaction, because they thought it unfair to hold twelve-month troops for a longer time, but after careful consideration they cheerfully acquiesced. On the 18th of April, 1862, General Holmes, in command at Goldsboro, ordered the regiment at Camp Mason to re-organize for the war. The result was as follows: Thos. S. Kenan, colonel (did not accept); Wm. J. Hoke, elected on 24th; R. F. Armfield, lieutenant-colonel; L. D. Andrews, major. Company A—A. G. Mosely, captain; D. D. Morrisey, first lieutenant; N. E. Armstrong, second lieutenant; A. J. Brown, junior second lieutenant. Company B—C. L. Cook, captain; A. W. Blackburn, first lieutenant; L. F. Haynes, second lieutenant;