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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
literature. We regret that our limited space will allow us little more than a bare mention of the table of contents of this number: In Southern Poetry — a sketch, Rev. H. Melville Jackson gives a very pleasing and, in the main, judicious statement of the claims of Southern poets, together with some well selected illustrations of their style. Rev. Dr. W. P. Harrison gives an interesting sketch of the rise, progress and extension of the Southern Methodist church. Professor George Frederick Holmes treats The eastern question and the Berlin treaty with the fulness and ability which characterize the productions of the distinguished author. Frances Hodgson Burnett and her Novels is an article from the graceful pen of Mrs. Herrick, and in her happiest vein, and will make the readers of the Review rejoice to know that she is still to be a regular contributor. Hon. William M. Burwell, of New Orleans, contributes an interesting and valuable paper On Yellow fever.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Materials for a history of the Disruption of the Union and of the late war. (search)
f the late war. In just commemoration, the following circular finds place here. It is one of those originally printed, which was preserved by Professor George Frederick Holmes, Ll.D., and which has been deposited by him in the archives of the Southern Historical Society. In a letter accompanying it, Professor Holmes writes:Professor Holmes writes: It was sent to the chief officers of the Federal and Confederate Governments, to the Governors and Secretaries of States, to the Presidents and Secretaries of Conventions, to the presiding officers and chief clerks of Senates and Legislatures, in both North and South. It was acknowledged by only one person to whom it wa perpetuate, in an accessible form, the unadulterated and indispensable sources of future history. We have the honour to subscribe ourselves, With assurances of profound consideration and respect, Your Obedient Serv'ts. Geo. Frederick Holmes, Committee of the Faculty of the Univ. of Virginia. Jas. L. Cabell, Jno. B. Minor,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.46 (search)
Times: In reading the excellent address of Capt. R. S. Parks to the veterans [see ante pp. 354-364], as reported in your paper, and the beautiful and fitting verses with which he closed, it occurred to me that you would enjoy, if you have never seen it, or read it, the entire poem as delivered by the author, the Hon. A. C. Gordon, of Staunton, Va., upon the occasion of unveiling the monument erected to the Confederate dead at Staunton, Va., and I enclose you a copy. The late Professor George Fred. Holmes told the writer of this that he considered Mr. Armistead Gordon's poem the finest on such an occasion he had read since the war. With many other distinguishing qualities, I am happy that Virginia has in this son one who writes so beautifully in verse. He has written as well in prose, it may be assumed, for, as fellow student with Thomas Nelson Page at the University of Virginia, he yielded to the latter (it has been admitted), some conceptions-upon which our dialect writer ro