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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Massachusetts, (search)
tion of the Rhode Island charter. Before their departure, Mr. Clarke, with Mr. Crandall and Obadiah Holmes, delegates from the Baptist Church in Newport, visited an aged Baptist brother in Lynn, Massnds paid his fine, and he was released. Crandall, fined $25, was released at the same time; but Holmes, a recent convert to Anabaptism, and lately excommunicated, who was fined $150, had more of the d, I bless God I am counted worthy to suffer for the name of Jesus. Some friends offered to pay Holmes's fine, but he declined it, and was taken to the public whipping-post, where he was scourged wite him thirty stripes most vigorously, the man spitting on his hands three times. When led away, Holmes said to the magistrates, You have struck me with roses, and prayed the punishment might not be lBlessed be God. They were arrested for contempt of authority, fined 40s. each, and imprisoned. Holmes returned to Newport, and lived to old age. Not long afterwards Sir Richard Saltonstall, one o
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Miami, Fort (search)
Miami, Fort Erected near the present city of Fort Wayne, Ind., was garrisoned by Ensign Holmes and ten men. On the morning of May 27, 1763, he was informed that the fort at Detroit had been attacked, and he put his men on their guard. The same day an Indian woman came to Holmes, saying a squaw in a cabin 300 yards off was ill, and wished him to bleed her. He went out, and was shot. The sergeant followed, and was made prisoner, when the rest of the garrison surrendered to the Indians whty of Fort Wayne, Ind., was garrisoned by Ensign Holmes and ten men. On the morning of May 27, 1763, he was informed that the fort at Detroit had been attacked, and he put his men on their guard. The same day an Indian woman came to Holmes, saying a squaw in a cabin 300 yards off was ill, and wished him to bleed her. He went out, and was shot. The sergeant followed, and was made prisoner, when the rest of the garrison surrendered to the Indians who swarmed in the forest nearby. See Pontiac.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Massachusetts (search)
Springfield, having published a book upon Redemption and justification, the General Court orders it to be publicly burned in the market-place as containing doctrines of a dangerous tendency......1649 John Clarke, a minister from the Baptist church at Newport, R. I., and two others are arrested at Lynn as Baptists and sent to Boston, where Clarke is sentenced to pay a fine of £ 20 or be whipped; the fine is paid and he is released with the injunction to leave the colony......1651 Obadiah Holmes, one of Clarke's companions, is fined £ 30; not paying it, he gets thirty strokes with a three-corded whip and is sent out of the colony......1651 Hugh Parsons and his wife Mary tried for witchcraft; Mrs. Parsons dies in prison, Parsons is acquitted......1651 Oliver Cromwell invites people of Massachusetts to Ireland......1651 French of Canada appeal to the people of New England for aid against the Iroquois without success......1651 Mint set up at Boston (by the General Court
olon. Society, 1.301; backs Cresson, 353. Hodgson, Joseph, 2.59. Hoge, Thomas [d. 1835], 2.323. Holiness, doctrine of. See Perfectionism. Holley, Myron [b. Salisbury, Conn., April 29, 1779; d. Rochester, N. Y., Mar. 4, 1841], career, 2.259; Third Party resolutions, 309; at Cleveland Convention, 310, support and opposition, 311, defeat, 314; success at Warsaw Convention, 319, and Arcade, 341; prepares Albany Convention, 339-342; Life by E. Wright, 316.— Portrait in Life. Holmes, Obadiah, Rev. [d. 1682, aged 75], 1.426. Holst, Hermann von [b. 1841], censure of Thompson, 1.439. Homer, James L., excites Boston mob, 2.10, 11, divides the relics, 18; vote in Mass. House, 128; death, 35. Hopedale (Mass.) Community, 2.328. Hopkinson, Thomas [1804-1856], 1.453. Hopper, Isaac Tatem [b. near Woodbury, N. J., Dec. 3, 1771; d. N. Y. City, May 7, 1852], father of Mrs. Gibbons, 2.345; proposed agent A. S. depository, 359.—Portrait in Life. Horsenail, William, 1.353.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 13: Marriage.—shall the Liberator die?George Thompson.—1834. (search)
e Society, at Ibid., 2.484. its organization in 1829. Reared in the Baptist faith, his views had gravitated towards those of the Society of Friends, to whose principles respecting war, slavery, and oaths he became a convert. This was rather a case of reversion than of conversion, for the affinity between the early Friends and the Baptists was very strong (see Tallack's George Fox, the Friends and the early Baptists). One of Mr. Benson's ancestors, on the maternal side, was that Rev. Obadiah Holmes who was publicly whipt in Boston, in 1651, for holding service at the bedside of an invalid brother Baptist, and whose account of his behavior under this persecution (in Clarke's Newes from New England) shows how little he differed in spirit and in manne from the equally outraged Quakers. He cherished their spirit, dressed very much in their style, and generally [while in Providence] attended their religious meetings. Two of his daughters became Friends through convincement. Relig
Cadets In tents on Boston Common, Aug. 8, 1821 Weights and Measures regulated in the Province, 1705 West street Gate at the Common, completed, June 7, 1862 Whipped A man for shooting a fowl Sunday, Nov. 30, 1630 Philip Ratcliff, for scandal, June 14, 1631 Josiah Plaisted, for stealing, Sep. 27, 1631 A man, for profane swearing, Sep. 4, 1632 Several men and women, for petty crimes, Oct., 1632 Mrs. Oliver, for reproaching the Magistrates, Dec. 9, 1640 Obadiah Holmes, for being a Baptist, Feb., 1651 Holden and Copeland, Quakers, whipped and gagged, Sep. 23, 1657 Horrid Gardner, with a child at her breast, Quakeress, Sep., 1657 Many persons for being Baptists, 1667 Margaret Brewster, a Quakeress, at the cart's tail, July 8, 1677 A man that married his sister, Apr. 20, 1695 Three women, for lewdness, March, 1718 A boy aged thirteen, for indecent assault, Feb. 26, 1725 Elizabeth Creighton, for lewdness, Nov. 26, 1754 Six negro