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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 112 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 50 2 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 27 1 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 21 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 13 1 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 11 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 9 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for T. H. Holmes or search for T. H. Holmes in all documents.

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y companies met and drove this body. Brig.-Gen. T. H. Holmes, in command, reported that he then haderate force of some 2,500 men, under Brig.-Gen. T. H. Holmes. Beauregard had a small advanced outstion made that the army of the Shenandoah and Holmes' brigade at Aquia creek should be ordered to reinforce Manassas. Davis promptly ordered Holmes to report to Beauregard, and gave Johnston discret Johnston's men with twenty guns, and 1,265 of Holmes', with six guns, arrived upon Beauregard's lefstrations toward Centreville. The brigades of Holmes and Early and two regiments of Bonham's brigad that he should take the brigades of Ewell and Holmes, which were marching, from the extreme right, ans', 20 killed, 118 wounded and 8 missing; in Holmes', no losses; in the Eighth Louisiana, Col. H. paratively fresh, and later by the brigades of Holmes, Ewell and Early. This favorable aspect for fEwell, Early, Whiting, D. R. Jones, Sam Jones, Holmes, Evans, Elzey, Radford and Jordan—all graduat[2 more...]
ades]. Consequently he withdrew in order. The enemy was evidently too much crippled to follow in pursuit, and after a short halt at the railroad I proceeded to Fryingpan church, where the wounded were cared for. Early next morning, with two fresh regiments, Stuart returned to the field, and found that the enemy had evacuated Dranesville and left some of their wounded there. The official returns of casualties were, on the Federal side, 7 killed and 61 wounded; on the Confederate, 43 killed, 143 wounded and 8 missing. The return of the department of Northern Virginia, Gen. J. E. Johnston commanding, for December, showed for the Potomac district, General Beauregard, aggregate infantry, cavalry and artillery, present and absent, 68,047; aggregate present, 55,165; effective total, 44,563. The forces in the Valley district, General Jackson, were reported at 12,922 present; in the Aquia district, General Holmes, 8,244, raising the aggregate present of Johnston's command to 76,331.
Joseph E. Johnston, on the field of its victory at Manassas, while its right rested at Fredericksburg, in command of General Holmes, and Jackson held its left in the lower Shenandoah valley. Practically its pickets patroled the Potomac from Chesapeell appeared in front of the staunch old city on the Rappahannock near the close of May, when the Confederates, under General Holmes, fell back toward Richmond. Lincoln visited McDowell's camp, on the Stafford heights, May 23d, and it was then decidton Roads; across Hampton Roads, Magruder was holding the peninsula, before Fortress Monroe and Hampton, with 11,000 men; Holmes held the Rappahannock, at Fredericksburg, with a brigade of 2,000; Johnston held the line of the upper Rappahannock withattered forces by the armies of observation that his numbers permitted him to place before Johnson, Jackson, Johnston and Holmes, while he landed his great army for active invasion on the peninsula, and, brushing aside Magruder, and Huger, pushed rap
ow Drewry's bluff on the south side of that river. Holmes with 5,000 held the intrenched bluffs; Magruder andty road on the south side of White Oak swamp, while Holmes led his 6,000 down the River road to strike the liny the Darbytown road and the Long bridges road, and Holmes by the River road, to either support Hill and Longsr guard, that there stubbornly held the road; while Holmes failed to reach and head off McClellan at Malvern hile this Frayser's Farm-Glendale battle was raging, Holmes, with his 6,000 men and a six-gun battery on the Rinboats in the James, which had an enfiladed fire on Holmes' line, drove him back. At Holmes' call, Magruder wHolmes' call, Magruder was turned from near Longstreet's battlefield to Malvern hill, to take part in the conflict there pending; but Sykes in his rear, covering a cross road leading to Holmes' position on the River road. The whole front was fstreet were held in reserve, and it was useless for Holmes to attack the intrenched bluff before him bristling