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emy could not be ascertained. They filled a large Michigan wagon, belonging to Lieutenant Chandler, with the dead and wounded, and carried them off the field. Of the Home Guard the following were known to be killed: A. G. Stewart, Second Lieutenant; Thos. J. Estes, private; mortally wounded: Joseph Laroue; the following were also wounded: George Counts, arm shattered; the man who first informed Capt. McFall's men of the fight; Wm. Counts, shot in thigh; Thomas Howe, shot in shoulder; Thomas Holmes, slightly wounded in side of head; Lieut. Chandler, flesh wound in arm; A. H. Tullock, wounded in abdomen. The rebels perpetrated a singular blunder. They approached the house in which the eighteen prisoners, taken from them the day before, were confined, and the leader of the party saying, Here is a party of the d----d abolitionists, give 'em h — ll, fired in upon the latter and burst open the door. Some of the prisoners were undoubtedly wounded, as groans were heard from the qua
lment to the brother of one of the parties concerned: Just before the war broke out, and before Lincoln's proclamation was issued, a young Virginian named Summerfield was visiting the city of New York, where he made the acquaintance of two Misses Holmes, from Waterbury, Vt. He became somewhat intimate with the young ladies, and the intercourse seemed to be mutually agreeable. The proclamation was issued, and the whole North thrown into a blaze of excitement. Upon visiting the ladies one evine new overcoat strapped to his back, which he determined to appropriate to his own use. The fight was over, and Summerfield had time to examine his prize, when, remarkable as it may appear, the coat was marked in the lining with the name of Thomas Holmes, and in the pockets were found letters, signed with the name of the sister, whom Summerfield had known in New York, and to whom he had made the remark we have quoted, in which the dead man was addressed as brother. The evidence was conclusiv
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
e of the seventeenth century. John Pleasants, the ancestor of the worthy family of the name in this country, emigrated from Norwich, England, to Virginia in 1665, and settled in Henrico county in 1668. In the records of the county, of date October 1, 1692, appears the following: John Pleasants, in behalf of himself and other Quakers, did this day, in open court, p'sent ye following Acc't of ye Quaker places of public meeting in this county, viz.: Att our Public Meeting House. † Thomas Holmes [presumed to be the minister]; Att Mary Maddox's, a monthly meeting; Att John Pleasants'. These are directed to be committed to record as the Act of Parliament enjoins, they being the places of public worship. † John Pleasants, Henry Randolph, C. C. Record-book Henrico county, page 352. The Record-Book of the Henrico meetings of the Society of Friends from 1699 to 1746 is preserved. At a monthly meeting of the Society of Friends held March 3, 1700, it was agreed with John Pleas
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.42 (search)
ini, Cochran, Davis, DeMaine, Doggett, Petty, Dinwiddie, W., Dinwiddie, M., Dominck, Ewing, Evans, Freeman, Fleiner, Flannigan, W. W., Gleason, Guillemot, C. J. Orderly Sergeant, Hitt, Hunter, Holmes, James, Sergeant, Holmes, Hammond, Irving, Carter, Irving, Jesse, Lawrence, Lucas, Link, Larking, Lumpkin, McGregor, Jesse, Moore, H. L., Montenegro, McClellan; O'Brien, O., Sergeant, Prime, Sergeant, Holmes, Hammond, Irving, Carter, Irving, Jesse, Lawrence, Lucas, Link, Larking, Lumpkin, McGregor, Jesse, Moore, H. L., Montenegro, McClellan; O'Brien, O., Sergeant, Prime, Sergeant, Pearce, Paoli, Rassini, Roberts, Ryan, (boy) Smith, 2d., Smith, J. C., Bugler, Shreve, George, Sergeant, Shields, Sully, Turner, Tapp, Wingfield, Yallapo—89. Romain, Smith, 1st., Smith, 3d., Shirley, First Sergeant, Simpson, N. V., Spallorensi, Shilling, Tutt, Phillip Vinne, Peter, Win
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Joseph E. Johnston. (search)
once on Grant. As the troops in Arkansas and those under Pemberton had the same great object—the defence of the Mississippi Valley—and both opposed to troops having one object—the possession of the Mississippi—the main force of the latter operating on the east side of the river; the more direct and immediate cooperation of the former was the thing advised. He significantly adds, As our troops are now distributed, Vicksburg is in danger. He proposed, therefore, the union of the forces of Holmes and Pemberton; those of Bragg to co-operate if practicable. By the junction he could, as he believed, overwhelm Grant, then between the Tallahatchie and Holly Springs, far from his base—the place for victory. No notice having been taken of this plan, and suggestions made by him respecting the commands of Bragg and Pemberton, as well as objections interposed by him to the diminution of the former force to augment the latter, failing also of approval, Johnston acquired the feeling that
tening to assault Semon Greenburg, were each required to give $150 security to keep the peace. Finn was also committed to jail for five days for contempt of Court. Daniel Keys, for an assault upon Mary Sullivan, was held in $150 surety to keep the peace, and a former recognizance was declared forfeited. The Recorder thought the quiet of the city would be further secured by placing Mrs. Sullivan also under bonds to be of good behavior. R. F. Kirby, for keeping his bar-room open for a short time last Sunday morning, was fined $5; Christian Burgin, ditto, So A similar charge against Michael Prent was dismissed. Thos. Holmes and Margaret O'Brien, charged with assaulting Wm. O'Brien, continued until this morning. Andrew Best was fined $5 for violating an ordinance by purchasing butter in the Second Market to sell again. Malachi, slave of Edward Withers, received sentence of 39 lashes for violently assaulting Caroline Abrams, and was committed for going at large.
The Daily Dispatch: October 24, 1861., [Electronic resource], Discharge of disabled soldiers — Granting of furloughs. (search)
Miscellaneous cases. --Thomas Holmes and Margaret O'Brien, charged with assaulting Wm. O'Brien, made their appearance before the Mayor yesterday, but the testimony completely turned the tables upon the latter, who, while indulging in the domestic pastime of whipping his wife, was interfered with by Holmes. Mrs. O'B. made a touching narration of the cruelties of her spouse, which was entirely corroborated by the evidence of a little son. O'Brien was committed to jail in default of securitHolmes. Mrs. O'B. made a touching narration of the cruelties of her spouse, which was entirely corroborated by the evidence of a little son. O'Brien was committed to jail in default of security to keep the peace.--Jno. W. Woody was fined $5 for cussing a country man in the Second Market, having been provoked by a threatening demonstration against himself and horse.--John Emenhauser, for keeping his bar-room open on Sunday night, the 20th inst., was fined $5.--Edward, slave of Col. A. H. Cole, was ordered down for 20 lashes, for carrying his master's pistol without leave or license, and in violation of law.
o the brother of one of the parties concerned: Just before the war broke out, and before Lincoln's proclamation was issued, a young Virginian, named Summerfield, was visiting in the city of New York, where he made the acquaintance of two Misses Holmes, from Waterbury, Vermont. He became somewhat intimate with the young ladies, and the intercourse seemed to be mutually agreeable. The proclamation was issued, and the whole North thrown into a blaze of excitement Upon visiting the ladies onine new overcoat strapped to his back, which he determined to appropriate to his own use. The fight was over, and Summerfield had time to examine his prize, when, remarkable as it may appear, the coat was marked in the lining with the name of Thomas Holmes, and in the pockets were found letters signed with the name of the sister, whom Summerfield had known in New York, and to whom he had made the remark we have quoted, in which the dead man was addressed as brother. The evidence was conclusive
Dr. Chas Seldon, Richmond Isaac Wood, slave of Chas Wood, no county. King Abel, slave of Thos M Candish, Williamsburg. Eliza Gaskins, free, and children, Prince William. Louisa, free, and children, Prince William. Wm. H. Gaskins, free, and children, Prince William. Tom Dickerson, slave of Chas Dickerson, Greenbrier county, va. Susan Gaskins, free, and D Gaskins, H Gaskins, and Catherine Gaskins, her children, Prince William. Louisa Gibson, slave of Thomas Holmes, Prince William. Jim Johnson, free, Connecticut. Harrison Read, free, Prince William. Joe Bush, free, New York. Jas West, slave of Geo R Cocke, King and Queen. Oliver Pleasants, free, Charles City county. Chas Montgomery, free, Washington, D. C. Wm H Richards, free, Baltimore, Md. John Cox, slave of Richard Lyne, King and Queen. Richard Hudgins, slave of Capt Jno Taylor Charlottesville. Samuel Hill, free, Washington, D. C. Thos Jacks