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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, I. April, 1861 (search)
y to be encamped at the west end of the Avenue, guarding the Executive Mansion. We took an omnibus without delay and proceeded to the steamer. As soon as we left the shore, I fancied I saw many of the passengers breathing easier and more deeply. Certainly there was more vivacity, since we were relieved of the presence of Republicans. And at the breakfast table there was a freer flow of speech, and a very decided manifestation of secession proclivities. Among the passengers was Major Holmes, who had just resigned his commission in the U. S. army. He had been ordered to proceed with the expedition against Charleston; but declined the honor of fighting against his native land. The major is a little deaf, but has an intellectual face, the predominant expression indicating the discretion and prudence so necessary for success in a large field of operations. In reply to a question concerning the military qualities of Beauregard and Bragg, he said they were the flower of the you
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, IV. July, 1861 (search)
te condescending. My work pleases him; and I shouldn't be astonished if he resented the sudden absence of Mr. Jacques. But he should consider that Mr. J. is only an amateur clerk getting no pay, rich, and independent of the government. July 19 We had fighting yesterday in earnest, at Bull Run! Several brigades were engaged, and the enemy were repulsed with the loss of several hundred left dead and wounded on the field. That was fighting, and we shall soon have more of it. Brig.-Gen. Holmes, my friend and fellow-fugitive, now stationed near Fredericksburg, has been ordered by Gen. Beauregard to be ready to march at an hour's notice. And Col. Northrop's chin and nose have become suddenly sharper. He is to send up fighting rations for three days, and discerns the approach of sanguinary events Mr. Hunter calls every evening, just as the dusky shades of eve descend, to inquire if we have any news. July 20 The Secretary works too much-or rather does not economize his l
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XIX. October, 1862 (search)
on the roads. October 17 The article in the Whig is backed by one of a similar character in the Examiner. We shall see what effect they will have on the policy adopted by the Secretary of War. Although still unofficial, we have confirmatory accounts of Bragg's victory in Kentucky. The enemy lost, they say, 25,000 men. Western accounts are generally exaggerated. The President has appointed the following lieutenant-generals: Jackson, Longstreet, (Bishop) Polk, Hardee, Pemberton, Holmes, and Smith (Kirby). The raid of Stuart into Pennsylvania was a most brilliant affair. He captured and destroyed much public propertyre-specting that of individuals. The Abolitionists are much mortified, and were greatly frightened. The plan of this expedition was received at the department to-day-just as conceived and prepared by Lee, and it was executed by Stuart in a masterly manner. Advices from Winchester inform the government that McClellan is receiving large reinforcements.
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XX. November, 1862 (search)
roops into the interior is that he is afraid we will burn the cotton. It is reported that a fleet of the enemy's gun-boats are in the James River. November 13 The President has rebuked the Secretary of War in round terms for ordering Gen. Holmes to assume the command on this side the Mississippi. Perhaps Mr. Randolph has resolved to be really Secretary. This is the first thing I have ever known him to do without previously obtaining the President's sanction-and it must be confessed, confirmed, the entire corps will follow immediately. And he adds: Before the enemy's trains can leave Fredericksburg (for Richmond) this whole army will be in position. These letters were sent immediately to the President. A letter from Gen. Holmes calls for an immediate supply of funds ($24,000,000) for the trans-Mississippi Department. A letter from Gen. Pike says if Gen. Hindman (Ark.) is to control there, the Indian Country will be lost. We shall soon have a solution of Burnside
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 22 (search)
ts, preceded by one army of the enemy, and followed by another? Mr. Wigfall recommends the Secretary (as if he could do it! to concentrate all the armies of the West, and beat the enemy out of the Mississippi Valley. Gen. Johnston says Lieut.-Gen. Holmes has been ordered to reinforce Pemberton. Why, this is the very thing Mr. Randolph did, and lost his clerkship for it The President must have changed his mind. Gen. Randolph sent in his resignation as brigadier-general today. The youngr. It is said our President will command in Mississippi himselfthe army having no confidence in Pemberton, because he is a Yankee. We have a letter to-day from Gen. Pike (another Yankee), saying the Indian country is lost-lost, because Gens. Holmes and Hindman--Southern men-won't let him have his own way! The news from North Carolina is still cloudy. Gen. G. W. Smith is there (another Northern man). Gen. Elzey has been appointed to command this department during Gen. L.'s absen
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXII. January, 1863 (search)
was received from R. R. Collier, Petersburg, to-day, in favor of civil liberty, and against the despotism of martial law. Senator Clark, of Missouri, informed me to-day that my nephew, R. H. Musser, has been made a colonel (under Hindman or Holmes), and has a fine regiment in the trans-Mississippi Department. Lewis E. Harvie, president of the railroad, sends a communication to the Secretary (I hope it will reach him) inclosing a request from Gen. Winder to permit liquors to be transpor he dispersed. Providence may thus intervene in our behalf. It is feared that we have met with a serious blow in Arkansas, but it is not generally believed that so many (5000 to 7000 men) surrendered, as is stated in the Northern papers. Gen. Holmes is responsible for the mishap. Conscription drags its slow length along. It is not yet adding many to the army. The Assistant Secretary of War, and several others, by order of the Secretary of War, are granting a fearful number of exempt
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXV. April, 1863 (search)
l the slaves. We have news from Tennessee, which seems to indicate that Gen. Van Dorn has been beaten, losing a battery, after a sanguinary battle of several hours. Van Dorn had only cavalry-7000. This has a depressing effect. It seems that we lose all the battles of any magnitude in the West. This news may have been received by the President in advance of the public, and hence his indisposition. We shall have news now every day or so. Albert Pike is out in a pamphlet against Gens. Holmes and Hindman. He says their operations in Arkansas have resulted in reducing our forces, in that State, from forty odd thousand to less than 17,000. It was imprudent to publish such a statement. Albert Pike is a native Yankee, but he has lived a long time in the South. Gov. Vance is furious at the idea of conscribing magistrates, constables, etc. in North Carolina. He says it would be an annihilation of State Rights-nevertheless, being subject to militia duty by the laws of the Sta
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 27 (search)
h, and ought to be marked and exposed. May 25 Dispatches from the West inform us that three attempts to carry the city of Vicksburg by assault have been repulsed with heavy loss. Johnston is on the enemy's flank and rear, engendering a new army with rapidity, and if the garrison can hold out a little while, the city may be safe. Gens. Ewell and A. P. Hill have been made lieutenant-generals, and will command Jackson's corps. It appears that the Senate has not yet confirmed Hardee, Holmes, and Pemberton. The Washington correspondent of the New York Commercial Advertiser says Hooker's loss in killed and wounded amounted to over 23,000 men, and he left 24 guns on the other side of the Rappahannock. We got 8000 prisoners, which will make the loss 31,000 men, and it is said the stragglers, not yet collected, amount to 10,000 men! Only 13 guns fell into our hands, the rest fellinto the river! May 26 Reliable information of hard fighting at Vicksburg; but still, so far
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXVII. June, 1863 (search)
om again. He confesses that he issued the order to slaughter the Apaches in cold blood, and says it is the only mode of dealing with such savages. The President indorses on it that it is a confession of an infamous crime. Yesterday the enemy appeared on the Peninsula, in what numbers we know not yet; but just when Gen. Wise was about to attack, with every prospect of success, an order was received from Gen. Arnold Elzey to fall back toward the city, pickets and all. A letter from Gen. Holmes, containing an account from one of his scouts, shows that the enemy's militia in Arkansas and Missouri are putting to death all the men, young or old, having favored the Confederate cause, who fall into their hands. These acts are perpetrated by order of Gen. Prentiss. The President suggests that they be published, both at home and abroad. Mr. L. Heyliger, our agent at Nassau, sends an account of the firing into and disabling the British steamer Margaret and Jessee by the United St
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 29 (search)
go, were at Culpepper C. H., and may be soon this side of the Rappahannock. A battle and a victory may take place there. Col. J. Gorgas, I presume, is no friend of Pemberton; it is not often that Northern men in our service are exempt from jealousies and envyings. He sends to the Secretary of War to-day a remarkable statement of Eugene Hill, an ordnance messenger, for whom he vouches, in relation to the siege and surrender of Vicksburg. It appears that Hill had been sent here by Lieut.-Gen. Holmes for ammunition, and on his way back to the trans-Mississippi country, was caught at Vicksburg, where he was detained until after the capitulation. He declares that the enemy's mines did our works no more injury than our mines did theirs; that when the surrender took place, there were an abundance of caps, and of all kinds of ordnance stores; that there were 90,000 pounds of bacon or salt meat unconsumed, besides a number of cows, and 400 mules, grazing within the fortifications; and t
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