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N. P. Banks, U. S. volunteers, have reported that in compliance with said orders they have examined he law and facts involved in the question referred to them, and the arguments submitted thereupon, and find as follows: The Board, after careful examination of the law and facts involved in the question referred to them, and the arguments submitted therefrom, unanimously find, the question having been separately submitted as to the precedence in point of rank of each of them, that Major-Generals Geo. B. McClellan and J. C. Fremont, U. S. A., and Major-Generals J. A. Dix and N. P. Banks, U. S. V., have precedence respectively in point of rank over Major-General B. F. Butler, U. S. V. Jos. G. Totten, Brigadier-General and Chief of Engineers. J. H. Martindale, Brigadier-General and Military Governor, D. C. E. D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant-General. J. Holt. Approved. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War. By order of the Secretary of War. E. D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant-General.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 10: naval engagement at South-West pass.--the Gulf blockading squadron in November, 1861. (search)
nd it is important that during their session a collision of arms should be avoided, unless an attack should be made or there should be preparations for an attack. In either event the Brooklyn and the other vessels will act promptly. Your right and that of other officers in command at Pensacola freely to communicate with the Government by special messenger, and its right in the same manner to communicate with yourselves and them, will remain intact as the basis of the present instructions. J. Holt, Secretary of War. J. Toucey, Secretary of the Navy. There was no mistaking the purport of this telegram. The Confederates could assemble any number of troops they pleased at Pensacola, erect batteries, and prepare for any contingency,without the commanders of our naval vessels being able to interfere with them; at least, so these instructions were construed by Capt. Adams, the commanding naval officer, and when Gen. Scott (subsequent to Mr. Lincoln's inauguration) sent an order to la
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 7-12, 1862.--raid on Confederate line of communications between Chattanooga, Tenn., and Marietta, Ga. (search)
foes which illustrate far more faithfully than any human language could express it the demoniac spirit of a revolt, every throb of whose life is a crime against the very race to which we belong. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. Holt, Judge-Advocate-General. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War. No. 2.-letter from Maj. Gen. Don Carlos Buell, U. S. Army. Saratoga, August 5, 1863. Sir: In the Official Gazette of the 21st ultimo I see a report of Judge-Advocate-GeneJudge-Advocate-General Holt, dated March 27, relative to an expedition set on foot in April, 1862, under the authority and direction, as the report says, of General O. M. Mitchel, the object of which was to destroy the line of communications on the Georgia State Railroad between Atlanta and Chattanooga. The expedition was set on foot under my authority. The plan was arranged between Mr. Andrews, whom I had in employment from shortly after assuming command in Kentucky, and my chief of staff, Col. James B. Fry, a
e Department, Eighth army corps, Baltimore, November 11, 1862. To the Editors of the Baltimore American: In the report, as published in the newspapers, of the Commission, consisting of the following officers, Major-Gen. D. Hunter, United States volunteers; Major-General G. Cadwalader, United States volunteers; Brig.-General C. C. Augur, United States volunteers; Major Donn Piatt, Assistant Adjutant-Gen. United States volunteers; Capt. F. Ball, Aid-de-Camp, United States volunteers, and Col. J. Holt, Judge-Advocate General, called by the Government to investigate the conduct of certain officers connected with, and the circumstances attending the abandonment of Maryland Heights and the surrender of Harper's Ferry, I find the following remarks applying to myself: The Commission would not have dwelt upon this painful subject were it not for the fact that the officer who placed this incapable (Col. Miles) in command, should share in the responsibility, and in the opinion of the Com
e Department, Eighth army corps, Baltimore, November 11, 1862. To the Editors of the Baltimore American: In the report, as published in the newspapers, of the Commission, consisting of the following officers, Major-Gen. D. Hunter, United States volunteers; Major-General G. Cadwalader, United States volunteers; Brig.-General C. C. Augur, United States volunteers; Major Donn Piatt, Assistant Adjutant-Gen. United States volunteers; Capt. F. Ball, Aid-de-Camp, United States volunteers, and Col. J. Holt, Judge-Advocate General, called by the Government to investigate the conduct of certain officers connected with, and the circumstances attending the abandonment of Maryland Heights and the surrender of Harper's Ferry, I find the following remarks applying to myself: The Commission would not have dwelt upon this painful subject were it not for the fact that the officer who placed this incapable (Col. Miles) in command, should share in the responsibility, and in the opinion of the Com
of War ad interim. Of this letter you of course have a copy. This letter from Mr. Holt was communicated to me under the cover of a letter from all the Senators of thsame period; but, besides this rejection of the main proposition, there was in Mr. Holt's letter a distinct refusal to make any stipulation on the subject of reenforcthing to your Government, and had asked nothing at your hands, I looked not to Mr. Holt's letter but to the note addressed to me by the Senators of the seceded and se can be resorted to for such an object. Your reply to the Senators, through Mr. Holt, declares it to be your sole object to act strictly on the defensive, and to aould, I trust, endeavor to meet the emergency. It is added in the letter of Mr. Holt that at the present moment it is not deemed necessary to reenforce Major Anderfrom the government of South Carolina: The letter of the President, through Mr. Holt, may be received as the reply to the question you were instructed to ask, as t
Fort Sumter. Nay, more: Afterwards, says the General, Secretary Holt and myself endeavored, in vain, to obtain a ship-of-wartant service. This ball be stated in the language of Secretary Holt in his letter of the 5th March, 1861, in reply to cert its own limitation on the 5th February, the day when Secretary Holt finally and peremptorily announced to the South Carolian express refusal to enter into the proposed agreement. Mr. Holt says: I am happy to observe that, in your letter to Colontter to yourself from the Senators, communicating that of Mr. Holt of the 22d January. This letter of Mr. Holt, though fMr. Holt, though firm and decided in character, is courteous and respectful, both in tone and in terms. It reviews the subject in an able ane 8th February he addressed an insulting answer not to Secretary Holt, as usage and common civility required, but directly t we ever heard of it since. What effect this letter of Mr. Holt may have produced upon the truculent Governor of South Ca
moval of old muskets their value opinion of Mr. Holt in regard to the manner in which President Buuce on the 6th February] had passed away, Secretaries Holt and Toucey, Captain Ward of the navy, andon to the Secretary of War. This was read by Mr. Holt, greatly to his own surprise and that of evernt by finding among his papers a note from Secretary Holt to himself, dated on the 29th January, theging that few persons are as little liable as Mr. Holt to make a misstatement, either by accident oreeds to say that he does indeed remember that Mr. Holt, about this time, approached his bedside wheny other point of view. It is impossible that Mr. Holt, on the very day of the interview, and withou had commenced, I communicated the fact to Secretary Holt (acting for Secretary Cameron) just in timuence of a countermand of his order issued by Mr. Holt, his successor in the War Department. It r of Mr. Buchanan's administration, and whilst Mr. Holt was acting for Secretary Cameron, who had not[10 more...]
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
ry, I received from the war department the following reply to my telegram: Capt. Arnold Elzey, Second Artillery, Commanding Augusta Arsenal, Georgia: The governor of Georgia has assumed against your post and the United States an attitude of war. His summons is harsh and peremptory. It is not expected that your defense shall be desperate. If forced to surrender by violence or starvation, you will stipulate for honorable terms and a free passage by water with your company to New York. J. Holt, Secretary of War. To have resisted such a force, then ready to attack me, with my knowledge of large reinforcements at Savannah and Atlanta ready to come up by rail at a moment's warning, would have been desperation in my weak position. I therefore directed my adjutant to address and convey the following note in reply to the governor's demand: Headquarters Augusta Arsenal, January 24, 1861. Col. H. R. Jackson, Aide-de-Camp: Sir: I have the honor to inform you that I am directed
.It took part in the siege of Cumberland Gap, and spent the fall and winter in Kentucky and east Tennessee. In April, Col. J. Thorington took command of the Legion, and was succeeded in command of the First battalion by Lieut.-Col. J. Holt, the whole Legion serving in Gracie's brigade at Chickamauga. In this battle it earned a splendid reputation. The First and Second battalions suffered the heaviest loss, leaving more than half their number either dead or wounded on the field. Lieutenant-Colonel Holt was severely wounded, and the command of the First battalion fell upon Captain Huguley. Maj. Daniel S. Troy was in command after Chickamauga. Lieutenant-Colonel Hall and Captain Walden, successively in command of the Second battalion, were both wounded. This battalion was the first to plant its banner on the enemy's works. The colors were pierced by 83 bullets. The standard-bearer, Robert Y. Hiett, was made a lieutenant. The other battalions also fought nobly and suffered sever
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