Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Joseph Holt or search for Joseph Holt in all documents.

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reason to the United States; the decisions of some of the most enlightened of the State judiciaries in repudiation of the dangerous dogma; the concurrent disavowal of it by the Marshalls, and Kents, and Storys, and McLeans, and Waynes, and Catrons, and Reverdy Johnsons, and Guthries, and all the really great jurists of the land; the brand of absurdity and wickedness which has been stamped upon it by Andrew Jackson, and Webster, and Clay, and Crittenden, and Everett, and Douglas, and Cass, and Holt, and Andrew Johnson, and Wickliffe, and Dickinson, and the great body of our truly eminent statesmen: these considerations and authorities present the doctrine of secession to me with one side only. But I do wish to inquire of my colleagues, if they have seriously reflected on the consequences of secession, should it come? Do you expect (as I have heard some of you declare) that the power and influence of Virginia are such that you will have peaceable secession, through an immediate rec
Doc. 90.-address of Joseph Holt. Delivered at Louisville, July 13th, 1861. Mr. Holt was introduced to the audience by Mr. Henry Pirtle, who addressed him a few words of welcome. Then taking the stand, amid prolonged cheers, Mr. Holt spoke as follows: Judge Pirtle: I beg you to be assured that I am most thankful for thiMr. Holt was introduced to the audience by Mr. Henry Pirtle, who addressed him a few words of welcome. Then taking the stand, amid prolonged cheers, Mr. Holt spoke as follows: Judge Pirtle: I beg you to be assured that I am most thankful for this distinguished and flattering welcome, and for every one of the kind words which have just fallen from your lips, as I am for the hearty response they have received. Spoken by any body and anywhere, these words would have been cherished by me; but spoken by yourself and in the presence and on behalf of those in whose midst I comMr. Holt spoke as follows: Judge Pirtle: I beg you to be assured that I am most thankful for this distinguished and flattering welcome, and for every one of the kind words which have just fallen from your lips, as I am for the hearty response they have received. Spoken by any body and anywhere, these words would have been cherished by me; but spoken by yourself and in the presence and on behalf of those in whose midst I commenced the battle of life, whose friendship I have ever labored to deserve, and in whose fortunes I have ever felt the liveliest sympathy, they are doubly grateful to my feelings. I take no credit to myself for loving and being faithful to such a Government as this, or for uttering, as I do, with every throb of my existence, a pr
Doc. 146.-speech of Joseph Holt, to the Kentucky troops under Gen. Rousseau, at camp Jo Holt, in Indiana, delivered July 31, 1861. Fellow-Citizens and Soldiers:--I say citizens, since you still are such, and it is only because you have resolved that no earthly power shall rob you of this proud title, or in any manner curtail the privileges and blessings associated with it, that you have become soldiers. Your soldiership is but the stately armor you have donned for the purpose of doing battle in defence of that citizenship which is at once the most intense and the most truthful expression of your political life. No poor words of mine could adequately convey to you the grateful emotions inspired by the kindness and warmth of this welcome. I should have been rejoiced to meet you anywhere; how full, therefore, the measure of my happiness must be to meet you here in such a presence and amid the thrilling associations inseparable from the scene, you can well understand. I should
Vice-President.--John C. Breckinridge, of Ky. Secretaries of State.--Lewis Cass, of Michigan; Jeremiah S. Black of Penn., appt. Dec. 17, 1860. Secretary of the Navy.--Isaac Toucey, of Conn. Secretaries of War.--John B. Floyd, of Va.; Joseph Holt, of Ky., appt. Jan. 18, 1861. Secretaries of the Treasury.--Howell Cobb, of Ga.; Philip F. Thomas, of Md., appt. Dec. 12, 1860; John A. Dix, of N. Y., appt. Jan. 11, 1861. Secretary of the Interior.--Jacob Thompson, of Miss. Postmay, of Conn. Secretaries of War.--John B. Floyd, of Va.; Joseph Holt, of Ky., appt. Jan. 18, 1861. Secretaries of the Treasury.--Howell Cobb, of Ga.; Philip F. Thomas, of Md., appt. Dec. 12, 1860; John A. Dix, of N. Y., appt. Jan. 11, 1861. Secretary of the Interior.--Jacob Thompson, of Miss. Postmasters-General.--Joseph Holt, of Ky.; Horatio King, of Me., appt. Feb. 12, 1861. Attorneys-General.--Jeremiah S. Black, of Penn.; Edwin M. Stanton, of Penn., appt. Dec. 20, 1860.