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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley. You can also browse the collection for John Holywell or search for John Holywell in all documents.

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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.5 (search)
ought of God we are tossed about on a sea of uncertainty; for what is our earth compared with the vast universe of worlds in unmeasurable space? But above all the vastness of infinity, of which the thoughts of the wisest men can extend to but an infinitesimal fraction, is the Divine and Almighty Intellect which ordered all this; and to Him I turn,--the Source of the highest energy, the Generator of the principle of duty. In the adults' ward at St. Asaph was a harmless imbecile, named John Holywell, who had been a resident of the house for about a score of years. He was now over fifty, and was likely to remain until his body was conveyed to a pauper's grave. As his fate, so mine promised, except that I could pray and read. Tyranny of the grossest kind lashed and scowled at us every waking hour, but even Will Thomas possessed something that I had not. He had relations who occasionally visited him with gifts; but I was alone, none ever came to see me. I must have been twelve
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.6 (search)
e. They gave me a meal; but married people, with a houseful of children, do not care to be troubled with the visits of poor relations, and the meaning conveyed by their manner was not difficult to interpret. I next visited the Golden lion, kept by Uncle Thomas; but here also, the house was full; and early on the following morning I was on my way to Brynford, to interview Moses Owen, the school-master. Brynford is a hamlet situate in the midst of a moory waste, about half an hour from Holywell, and about five minutes walk from Denbigh. The district is mostly given up to lead-mining. I stopped in front of a new National Schoolhouse, and the master's residence. My cousin was my last chance. If he refused his aid, my fate must necessarily be that of a young vagabond, for Wales is a poor country for the homeless and friendless. I was admitted by a buxom woman of decided temper, whose first view of me was with an ill-concealed frown. But as I requested to see Mr. Owen, the sch
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Index (search)
ne, Mr., 474. Hancock, General, expedition of, against the Kiowas and Comanches, 225-227. Happiness, thoughts on, 237, 238. Harcourt, Sir, William, 473. Hardinge, Captain, David, 67. Harman, Rev. Dr., 246. Harry, boy on board the Windermere, 70-72, 78, 79, 82-84. Hawthorn, Colonel A. T., 168. Healy, Tim, 475, 477. Heaton, Dick (Alice), 107-111. Henderson, Senator, 226, 227. Hills-Johnes, Sir James and Lady, hosts to Stanley, 464. Hindman, General T. C., 203, 204. Holywell, John, 28. Houldsworth, Sir, William, 476. House of Commons, Stanley becomes candidate for, but is defeated, 439; becomes a second time candidate, and is elected, 439-445, 466; Stanley's impressions of, 467-481, 501-505. Hubbard, Mr., 158, 161. Illusions, thoughts on, 523. Indians, American, the, 225-227. Ingham, Major, Stanley's meeting with, 142; takes Stanley home with him, 146; life on his plantation, 146-150. Ingham, Mrs., Annie, death of, 445. Ingham, C. E., death of, 4